Rustic pizza



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Rustic, delicious pizza, 100% homemade, with fluffy top and plenty of topping :)

  • For the dough:
  • 500 g flour,
  • 1 cube (25g) yeast,
  • 200 ml of warm milk,
  • 2 teaspoons sugar,
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt,
  • 3 tablespoons oil.
  • For topping:
  • Ham,
  • mushrooms,
  • tomato sauce,
  • pepper,
  • onion,
  • maize,
  • olive,
  • egg,
  • oregano,
  • cheese.

Servings: 4

Preparation time: less than 90 minutes

RECIPE PREPARATION Rustic pizza:

I put sifted flour in a bowl.

I added salt and sugar.

I dissolved the yeast in warm milk and added it over the flour. I put the oil and kneaded an elastic dough but not very soft.

I let it grow for 1 hour in a warm place.

Spread the dough on the floured table until we reach the desired thickness and shape (for me it had a totally crazy shape :)).

Then place in the tray on baking paper.

Put the tomato sauce on the counter, then the other ingredients in the order we want, but keep the egg in the middle of the counter and put the grated cheese on top.

I left it in the oven on low heat for medium to 20 minutes.

I served hot :)

A super delight !!


McCain launches frozen Rustica Sourdough pizza range

Frozen foods maker McCain has rolled out the new Rustica Sourdough pizza. The range has no artificial colors or flavors, and comes in four flavors: Salami & Four Cheese, Tuscan Style Meatballs and Smoked Ham & Aged Cheddar.

“The beauty of McCain Rustica is in its simplicity - our expert team have spent months carefully selecting each ingredient within the Rustica range so our customers can simply enjoy a great night in with friends and family, & # 8221 said Alice Briant, brand manager - pizzas, McCain Australia.

& # 8220And of course, we know the crust is just as important to our customers as the toppings, our crafted sourdough base is cooked directly on a hot stone for a deliciously light and crisp texture and authentic rustic appearance, enabling a restaurant quality experience in the comfort and convenience of their own home. ”

McCain Rustica comes in four new pizza flavors.

Salami & Four Cheese pizza has sliced ​​salami, pesto and aged cheddar, mozzarella, provolone & parmesan.

The Tuscan Style Meatballs contains Oregano & Thyme Meatballs and topped with aged cheddar, mozzarella and provolone. While the Smoked Ham & Aged Cheddar has double smoked ham, cremini mushrooms and aged cheddar, with McCain’s signature caramelized onion relish.

McCain Rustica Sourdough pizza range will be priced at $ 8 in Woolworths and independent supermarkets from February 2021 and is available in Coles nationally from June.


Pizza Rustica, aka: Pizza Gain: a Traditional Italian Easter Dish

P izza Rustica is a traditional, Italian dish that is served at Easter it & # 8217s part pastry, part pie, part quiche and part deli platter. Pizza Rustica is typically served at room temperature as an appetizer and, without fail, ruins my appetite for Easter dinner annually. It probably should be served with a defibrillator or at least a warning from the Surgeon General that it is both addictive and a heart-health hazard, but it is SO worth it!

Pizza rustica is also referred to as Pizzagaina or Pizza Gain. This recipe has been passed down in my husband’s family for generations. I tweaked Grandma Sue’s recipe just a little with my husband’s assurance that she would have been cool with it. The dish traditionally calls for pie crusts on top and bottom, but I like it with just one (pie crust just gets in the way of the best stuff!).

RUSTIC PIZZA(AKA PIZZA GAIN)

Yield: One ginormous pie that serves a small army.

INGREDIENTS

1 prepared pie crust, blind-baked (if you prefer a top crust, add it on top of filling prior to baking)
1 pound sweet sausage, cooked and crumbled
½ pound sharp provolone, diced
½ pound ham, diced
½ pound mozzarella, diced
¼ pound salami, diced
¼ pound pepperoni, diced
4 ounces freshly grated Pecorino Romano cheese
4 ounces freshly grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese
3 pounds ricotta cheese (traditionally, fresh basket cheese is used)
1/4 cup finely chopped chives
9 eggs, beaten
Freshly ground, black pepper

LET & # 8217S MAKE IT!

PREPARE BOTTOM CRUST
Blind-baking prevents the crust from becoming soggy- here & # 8217s how: Preheat oven to 400 ° F. Roll the dough to bottom line of 10 ”x 15” rectangle baking pan. Dough can come up the sides a bit. (If using 2 crusts, dough should come all the way up the sides of the pan.) Prick the crust lightly with a fork all over. Place a piece of parchment paper or aluminum foil on top of crust. Place uncooked rice or uncooked, dried beans on top of foil. Bake at 400 ° F for 20 minutes. Cool & carefully remove the parchment paper / foil and weights.

PREPARE FILLING
Preheat oven to 375 ° FMix the beaten eggs, pepper, chives and grated cheeses in a huge bowl. Add ricotta & combine well. Add meats & remaining cheeses and combine well. Pour filling into prepared crust (if using 2 crusts, add second crust at this point, crimp bottom & amp top crusts together, prick air holes with a knife & amp brush with egg wash). Bake at 375 ° F for one hour. Serve hot from the oven, at room temperature or cold from the fridge- it & # 8217s all good!

This is how the Pizza Rustica looks when it is removed from the oven. When it cools, it sets-up as shown in the following photo. Enjoy and give my love to your cardiologist!


Rustic Pizza - Recipes

I'm trying. Thanks for the recipe. Hello.

I & # 39m actually making a pizza on Friday for lunch :) I also make my own crust as it is very simple and takes about five minutes. I & # 39m stuffing mine with garlic, carrots and veggie cheese. For simple pizza crust you just mix one cup of yogurt (liquid one is better) with two cups of any kind of your fave flour, 2-3 tbsp of oil, a bit of baking powder and a pinch of salt. You mix it with a spoon, throw it onto the baking paper, roll it out and transfer it into the pan. And that is it.

Is the yogurt dairy or soy? Just curious because I don't remember if you eat any dairy. Sounds simple enough! Pizza Rustica is a pie. I'm not sure why they're trying to trick the world with such a name. :)

I generally don't make dairy, but I won't die if I make a yogurt pizza crust once in a two months or so LOL

The only dairy that I really do is the occasional fancy cheese in an antipasto and ice cream. Then I & # 39m sick for the rest of the night. LOL The only dairy product that doesn't bother me at all is ricotta cheese. Not sure why. Cream is the worst though. Ugh, it makes me feel like death. Cream gives me severe stomach pains.

I think we made one of those many years ago after seeing it in an Italian cookbook we have. Usually for Easter, we have a honey baked ham, deviled eggs and a coconut cake. Side dishes vary! One year I made an Easter lasagna that had ham, veggies and a bechamel sauce.

My grandma always makes a ham for Easter. It's one of my least favorite things in the world. My Nanny being the fabulous grandmother that she is, always has a fried chicken cutlet with applesauce waiting for me to eat instead. :) The Easter lasagna sounds good, but maybe we could sub the ham for bacon!


Rustic Pizza & # 8211 Easter Pie

My absolutely favorite Easter recipe is Casatiello or Tortano & # 8211 Italian Easter Bread. It is Napoletan recipe of homemade bread stuffed with cooked ham, spicy salami, ricotta cheese and hard boiled eggs. My guests love it so much that I have to make it for every Easter celebration. The photo does not reveal how good it actually tastes.

This year I tried something similar, an Italian Easter Pie aka Rustic Pizza or Pizzagaina. It uses almost the same ingredients with the addition of ricotta cheese.

TIP: If you notice that your ricotta cheese is very wet, you can let it sit in a colander lined with cheesecloth or coffee filter for several hours or even over night. This will help the cheese release excess moisture.

For the filling you can use any ham or salami that you have at home like Mortadella, Sopressata etc. Same thing goes with cheese: Provolone, Mozzarella, Parmesan, Pecorino, Grana Padano or other types of cheese that you prefer. I listed the ingredients I used, but you can change them to your liking. There is no need to put any salt in the filling because all other ingredients are salty enough.

Because Pizza Rustica is a kind of deep dish pizza, the best dish for baking it is a spring form cake pan, preferably non-stick. I lightly buttered the pan and put rolled out Crazy Dough in it, added filling and covered it with remaining dough. Then I applied an egg wash on the top to make it pretty and shiny.

This type of Easter Pie is traditionally baked a day or two before Easter and then served cold on Easter Sunday, even though it tastes good warm as well. But it is also an excellent way to use leftovers from Easter gathering the next day.

Since I baked the pie several days in advance, I cut it into quarters and put it in my freezer. I & # 8217ll let you know whether it is OK to freeze it or not (I guess it should be good). I plan to take it out of the freezer and put it into the refrigerator on Saturday evening & # 8211 it should thaw by Sunday.


Recipe Summary

  • 2 pounds ricotta cheese
  • 2 pounds bulk Italian sausage
  • 5 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 pound shredded mozzarella cheese
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped parsley
  • ¼ pound ham, chopped
  • freshly cracked black pepper to taste
  • 2 pounds prepared pizza dough
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons water

Place a piece of cheesecloth into a strainer, and place the ricotta cheese into the cheesecloth. Set a bowl underneath the strainer to catch drips, and refrigerate 8 hours, or overnight, to allow moisture to drip from ricotta.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).

Place sausage into a large skillet over medium heat, and cook and stir until browned and crumbly, about 10 minutes. Drain excess grease, and allow sausage to cool.

Place the drained ricotta cheese into a large bowl, and stir in 5 beaten eggs and mozzarella cheese until well mixed. Mix in the cooked sausage, Parmesan cheese, parsley, ham, and black pepper until thoroughly combined.

Divide the pizza dough into fourths, and roll out 2 of the pieces into 12-inch circles. Fit the circles into 2 10-inch pie plates, leaving 1 inch of dough hanging over the edge. Divide the filling between the 2 feet. Roll out 2 top crusts, place onto the feet, and fold the edges of the bottom crusts over the edges of the top crusts to seal. Crimp and flute the edges of the pie crusts.

Beat 1 egg with water in a small bowl, and brush the egg wash over the tops and edges of both feet. Cut several slits into the top crusts to vent steam.

Bake pies in the preheated oven for 15 minutes, then lower oven temperature to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Continue to bake until the crust is browned and the filling is hot, 45 to 50 more minutes. Serve at room temperature.


Rustic Pizza - Recipes

I'm trying. Thanks for the recipe. Hello.

I & # 39m actually making a pizza on Friday for lunch :) I also make my own crust as it is very simple and takes about five minutes. I & # 39m stuffing mine with garlic, carrots and veggie cheese. For simple pizza crust you just mix one cup of yogurt (liquid one is better) with two cups of any kind of your fave flour, 2-3 tbsp of oil, a bit of baking powder and a pinch of salt. You mix it with a spoon, throw it onto the baking paper, roll it out and transfer it into the pan. And that is it.

Is the yogurt dairy or soy? Just curious because I don't remember if you eat any dairy. Sounds simple enough! Pizza Rustica is a pie. I'm not sure why they're trying to trick the world with such a name. :)

I generally don't make dairy, but I won't die if I make a yogurt pizza crust once in a two months or so LOL

The only dairy that I really do is the occasional fancy cheese in an antipasto and ice cream. Then I & # 39m sick for the rest of the night. LOL The only dairy product that doesn't bother me at all is ricotta cheese. Not sure why. Cream is the worst though. Ugh, it makes me feel like death. Cream gives me severe stomach pains.

I think we made one of those many years ago after seeing it in an Italian cookbook we have. Usually for Easter, we have a honey baked ham, deviled eggs and a coconut cake. Side dishes vary! One year I made an Easter lasagna that had ham, veggies and a bechamel sauce.

My grandma always makes a ham for Easter. It's one of my least favorite things in the world. My Nanny being the fabulous grandmother that she is, always has a fried chicken cutlet with applesauce waiting for me to eat instead. :) The Easter lasagna sounds good, but maybe we could sub the ham for bacon!


Making Italian Meat Pie Is My Favorite Part of Easter

In uncertain times, pizza rustica brings joy to the table.

As the world practices social distancing to prevent the spread of coronavirus, holidays look a little different. People hosted their Passover seders over Zoom, paring down their big feasts to feed three, two, or even one, and this Easter Sunday, my family will be in the same boat. Weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; re not all that religious, but Easter dinner is a tradition weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ve always participated in, whether we’re hosting at ours or visiting in-laws. Piled around the table with relatives, my dad and I eat too many appetizers as my little cousins ​​run around and play their secret games. Each time, we find new reasons to laugh. & # XA0

It & # x2019s certainly going to be a lot quieter this year with our numbers down to just my mom, my dad, and me (four, if you count the dog). But I & # x2019m grateful that we have our health and can still prepare a celebratory meal. We & # x2019re swapping the classic giant ham for a much smaller pot roast using meat we have in the freezer, and we & aposll skip our typical spread of appetizers and desserts. But even with the reduced menu, thereâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s one traditional Easter dish we knew we absolutely had to makeâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; rustic pizza.

Not to be confused with pizza you & aposd get from a pizzeria, pizza rustica is actually & # xA0a giant baked Italian pie with two layers of pastry dough, one on the bottom and another blanket of crust on top. In between is a mixture of eggs, cheese, and so. much. meat. There are plenty of variations out there some just use salami, like this & # xA0recipe we have on Food & Wine, and others, like this Real Simple version, call for five (five!) different meats. In the dozen-plus years weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ve been making rustic pizza, weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ve always relied on the same vintage recipe from McCallâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s Cooking School, which simply requires sweet Italian sausage and prosciutto.

The page has a few notes scrawled on it & # x2014we use olive oil instead of the requisite salad oil, switch homemade pastry dough for pre-made, and add salami because the one thing Italian meat pie could always use more of is meat. (And, yeah, we skip the decorative dough leaves on top, too.) Even with the shortcuts, what comes out of the oven is so marvelously, consistently delicious that I can & # x2019t imagine making it any other way. & # XA0

If you cut out the dough-making steps and buy store-bought, the ingredient list is pretty short: olive oil, sweet Italian sausages, eggs (some raw, some hard-boiled), ricotta cheese, grated mozzarella cheese, grated Parmesan cheese , salami, ham, parsley, black pepper, and a little bit of water. Our version starts by browning crumbled sausages in a skillet and setting them aside, and then, beating eggs in a bowl. Next, you pile in all three cheeses, the sausage, parsley, black pepper, and deli meats, which should be coarsely chopped. & # XA0

Itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s quicker work, of course, if youâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; re able to divvy up the duties. One to cook the sausage, one to preside over the hard-boiled eggs, perhaps another to slice the prosciutto and salami. For the first few years, my mom made the pie on her own, and I remember watching her go through the motions before I, too, joined the assembly line. I & # x2019m so glad that I didâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; breaks. Itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s a warm feeling, creating something together with someone you love.

After the fillingâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s mixed together, all thatâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s left to do is assemble the pie and bake. A layer of pastry dough goes into the pie pan first, and then the meat and egg mixture. Youâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; re probably wondering where those hard-boiled eggs come inâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s the time. With a spoon, you create indentations into the filling and place a whole egg, shell removed, in each, forming a circle like the picture above. Youâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ll then swath them with a little more filling and the final layer of pastry dough, crimping the edges and sealing everything in kind of like a quiche sandwich. (At least, thatâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s how I think of it.) With a brush of egg yolk for color and a few slits cut for ventilation, the pieâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s ready to bake.

35 to 40 minutes later, the glorious, golden pizza rustica emerges. Itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s tempting to cut into it as soon as itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s cool enough to eat, and some recipes do call for serving it warm, including our own. But we like to prepare it the day beforehand and then eat cold slices for Easter breakfast & # x2014something about letting the ingredients meld together in the fridge overnight really enhances the flavors. Savory sausage, ham, and salami brightness from the parsley butteriness from the crust. One hearty slice will definitely be enough to carry you well into the afternoon, and youâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; re pretty much guaranteed to have some leftovers as well. Those were often my favorite partâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; when I was younger, Iâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t take a wedge of pie and proudly tote it to school in Tupperware for lunch.

Middle school turned to high school, high school turned to college & # x2014my parents would graciously bring pre-made pie with them for Easter visits & # x2014and college turned to work, where yes, I & # x2019ve still packed leftover pie for lunch the past few years . Itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s a tradition I look forward to as much as making cookies for Christmas and fresh pesto for summer. And in these uncertain times, itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s a comforting and familiar routine to fall back on. I wonâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t be packing leftovers to go anywhere this year, of course. But Iâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ll be enjoying them with my family, and for that, Iâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; m incredibly thankful.


Making Italian Meat Pie Is My Favorite Part of Easter

In uncertain times, rustic pizza brings joy to the table.

As the world practices social distancing to prevent the spread of coronavirus, holidays look a little different. People hosted their Passover seders over Zoom, paring down their big feasts to feed three, two, or even one, and this Easter Sunday, my family will be in the same boat. Weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; re not all that religious, but Easter dinner is a tradition weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ve always participated in, whether we’re hosting at ours or visiting in-laws. Piled around the table with relatives, my dad and I eat too many appetizers as my little cousins ​​run around and play their secret games. Each time, we find new reasons to laugh. & # XA0

It & # x2019s certainly going to be a lot quieter this year with our numbers down to just my mom, my dad, and me (four, if you count the dog). But I & # x2019m grateful that we have our health and can still prepare a celebratory meal. We & # x2019re swapping the classic giant ham for a much smaller pot roast using meat we have in the freezer, and we & aposll skip our typical spread of appetizers and desserts. But even with the reduced menu, thereâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s one traditional Easter dish we knew we absolutely had to make â & # x20AC; & # x2122; rustic pizza.

Not to be confused with pizza you & aposd get from a pizzeria, pizza rustica is actually & # xA0a giant baked Italian pie with two layers of pastry dough, one on the bottom and another blanket of crust on top. In between is a mixture of eggs, cheese, and so. much. meat. There are plenty of variations out there some just use salami, like this & # xA0recipe we have on Food & Wine, and others, like this Real Simple version, call for five (five!) different meats. In the dozen-plus years weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ve been making rustic pizza, weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ve always relied on the same vintage recipe from McCallâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s Cooking School, which simply requires sweet Italian sausage and prosciutto.

The page has a few notes scrawled on it & # x2014we use olive oil instead of the requisite salad oil, switch homemade pastry dough for pre-made, and add salami because the one thing Italian meat pie could always use more of is meat. (And, yeah, we skip the decorative dough leaves on top, too.) Even with the shortcuts, what comes out of the oven is so marvelously, consistently delicious that I canâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t imagine making it any other way. & # XA0

If you cut out the dough-making steps and buy store-bought, the ingredient list is pretty short: olive oil, sweet Italian sausages, eggs (some raw, some hard-boiled), ricotta cheese, grated mozzarella cheese, grated Parmesan cheese , salami, ham, parsley, black pepper, and a little bit of water. Our version starts by browning crumbled sausages in a skillet and setting them aside, and then, beating eggs in a bowl. Next, you pile in all three cheeses, the sausage, parsley, black pepper, and deli meats, which should be coarsely chopped. & # XA0

Itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s quicker work, of course, if youâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; re able to divvy up the duties. One to cook the sausage, one to preside over the hard-boiled eggs, perhaps another to slice the prosciutto and salami. For the first few years, my mom made the pie on her own, and I remember watching her go through the motions before I, too, joined the assembly line. Iâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; m so glad that Iâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ve wanted to help her out, itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s created a nice set of memories, and new ones to look forward to each year: the meditative chopping, the smell of the sausage cooking, the mini dance breaks. Itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s a warm feeling, creating something together with someone you love.

After the fillingâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s mixed together, all thatâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s left to do is assemble the pie and bake. A layer of pastry dough goes into the pie pan first, and then the meat and egg mixture. Youâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; re probably wondering where those hard-boiled eggs come inâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s the time. With a spoon, you create indentations into the filling and place a whole egg, shell removed, in each, forming a circle like the picture above. Youâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ll then swath them with a little more filling and the final layer of pastry dough, crimping the edges and sealing everything in kind of like a quiche sandwich. (At least, thatâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s how I think of it.) With a brush of egg yolk for color and a few slits cut for ventilation, the pieâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s ready to bake.

35 to 40 minutes later, the glorious, golden pizza rustica emerges. Itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s tempting to cut into it as soon as itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s cool enough to eat, and some recipes do call for serving it warm, including our own. But we like to prepare it the day beforehand and then eat cold slices for Easter breakfast & # x2014something about letting the ingredients meld together in the fridge overnight really enhances the flavors. Savory sausage, ham, and salami brightness from the parsley butteriness from the crust. One hearty slice will definitely be enough to carry you well into the afternoon, and youâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; re pretty much guaranteed to have some leftovers as well. Those were often my favorite partâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; when I was younger, Iâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t take a wedge of pie and proudly tote it to school in Tupperware for lunch.

Middle school turned to high school, high school turned to college & # x2014my parents would graciously bring pre-made pie with them for Easter visits & # x2014and college turned to work, where yes, Iâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ve still packed leftover pie for lunch the past few years . Itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s a tradition I look forward to as much as making cookies for Christmas and fresh pesto for summer. And in these uncertain times, itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s a comforting and familiar routine to fall back on. I wonâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t be packing leftovers to go anywhere this year, of course. But Iâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ll be enjoying them with my family, and for that, Iâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; m incredibly thankful.


Making Italian Meat Pie Is My Favorite Part of Easter

In uncertain times, pizza rustica brings joy to the table.

As the world practices social distancing to prevent the spread of coronavirus, holidays look a little different. People hosted their Passover seders over Zoom, paring down their big feasts to feed three, two, or even one, and this Easter Sunday, my family will be in the same boat. Weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; re not all that religious, but Easter dinner is a tradition weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ve always participated in, whether we’re hosting at ours or visiting in-laws. Piled around the table with relatives, my dad and I eat too many appetizers as my little cousins ​​run around and play their secret games. Each time, we find new reasons to laugh. & # XA0

It & # x2019s certainly going to be a lot quieter this year with our numbers down to just my mom, my dad, and me (four, if you count the dog). But I & # x2019m grateful that we have our health and can still prepare a celebratory meal. We & # x2019re swapping the classic giant ham for a much smaller pot roast using meat we have in the freezer, and we & aposll skip our typical spread of appetizers and desserts. But even with the reduced menu, thereâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s one traditional Easter dish we knew we absolutely had to make â & # x20AC; & # x2122; rustic pizza.

Not to be confused with pizza you & aposd get from a pizzeria, pizza rustica is actually & # xA0a giant baked Italian pie with two layers of pastry dough, one on the bottom and another blanket of crust on top. In between is a mixture of eggs, cheese, and so. much. meat. There are plenty of variations out there some just use salami, like this & # xA0recipe we have on Food & Wine, and others, like this Real Simple version, call for five (five!) different meats. In the dozen-plus years weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ve been making rustic pizza, weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ve always relied on the same vintage recipe from McCallâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s Cooking School, which simply requires sweet Italian sausage and prosciutto.

The page has a few notes scrawled on it & # x2014we use olive oil instead of the requisite salad oil, switch homemade pastry dough for pre-made, and add salami because the one thing Italian meat pie could always use more of is meat. (And, yeah, we skip the decorative dough leaves on top, too.) Even with the shortcuts, what comes out of the oven is so marvelously, consistently delicious that I can & # x2019t imagine making it any other way. & # XA0

If you cut out the dough-making steps and buy store-bought, the ingredient list is pretty short: olive oil, sweet Italian sausages, eggs (some raw, some hard-boiled), ricotta cheese, grated mozzarella cheese, grated Parmesan cheese , salami, ham, parsley, black pepper, and a little bit of water. Our version starts by browning crumbled sausages in a skillet and setting them aside, and then, beating eggs in a bowl. Next, you pile in all three cheeses, the sausage, parsley, black pepper, and deli meats, which should be coarsely chopped. & # XA0

Itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s quicker work, of course, if youâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; re able to divvy up the duties. One to cook the sausage, one to preside over the hard-boiled eggs, perhaps another to slice the prosciutto and salami. For the first few years, my mom made the pie on her own, and I remember watching her go through the motions before I, too, joined the assembly line. I & # x2019m so glad that I didâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; breaks. Itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s a warm feeling, creating something together with someone you love.

After the fillingâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s mixed together, all thatâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s left to do is assemble the pie and bake. A layer of pastry dough goes into the pie pan first, and then the meat and egg mixture. Youâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; re probably wondering where those hard-boiled eggs come inâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s the time. With a spoon, you create indentations into the filling and place a whole egg, shell removed, in each, forming a circle like the picture above. Youâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ll then swath them with a little more filling and the final layer of pastry dough, crimping the edges and sealing everything in kind of like a quiche sandwich. (At least, thatâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s how I think of it.) With a brush of egg yolk for color and a few slits cut for ventilation, the pieâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s ready to bake.

35 to 40 minutes later, the glorious, golden pizza rustica emerges. Itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s tempting to cut into it as soon as itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s cool enough to eat, and some recipes do call for serving it warm, including our own. But we like to prepare it the day beforehand and then eat cold slices for Easter breakfast & # x2014something about letting the ingredients meld together in the fridge overnight really enhances the flavors. Savory sausage, ham, and salami brightness from the parsley butteriness from the crust. One hearty slice will definitely be enough to carry you well into the afternoon, and youâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; re pretty much guaranteed to have some leftovers as well. Those were often my favorite partâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; when I was younger, Iâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t take a wedge of pie and proudly tote it to school in Tupperware for lunch.

Middle school turned to high school, high school turned to college & # x2014my parents would graciously bring pre-made pie with them for Easter visits & # x2014and college turned to work, where yes, I & # x2019ve still packed leftover pie for lunch the past few years . Itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s a tradition I look forward to as much as making cookies for Christmas and fresh pesto for summer. And in these uncertain times, itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s a comforting and familiar routine to fall back on. I wonâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t be packing leftovers to go anywhere this year, of course. But Iâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ll be enjoying them with my family, and for that, Iâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; m incredibly thankful.


Making Italian Meat Pie Is My Favorite Part of Easter

In uncertain times, rustic pizza brings joy to the table.

As the world practices social distancing to prevent the spread of coronavirus, holidays look a little different. People hosted their Passover seders over Zoom, paring down their big feasts to feed three, two, or even one, and this Easter Sunday, my family will be in the same boat. Weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; re not all that religious, but Easter dinner is a tradition weâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; ve always participated in, whether we’re hosting at ours or visiting in-laws. Piled around the table with relatives, my dad and I eat too many appetizers as my little cousins ​​run around and play their secret games. Each time, we find new reasons to laugh. & # XA0

It & # x2019s certainly going to be a lot quieter this year with our numbers down to just my mom, my dad, and me (four, if you count the dog). But I & # x2019m grateful that we have our health and can still prepare a celebratory meal. We’re swapping the classic giant ham for a much smaller pot roast using meat we have in the freezer, and we&aposll skip our typical spread of appetizers and desserts. But even with the reduced menu, there’s one traditional Easter dish we knew we absolutely had to make—pizza rustica. 

Not to be confused with pizza you&aposd get from a pizzeria, pizza rustica is actuallyਊ giant baked Italian pie with two layers of pastry dough, one on the bottom and another blanket of crust on top. In between is a mixture of eggs, cheese, and so. much. meat. There are plenty of variations out there some just use salami, like this recipe we have on Food & Wine, and others, like this Real Simple version, call for five (five!) different meats. In the dozen-plus years we’ve been making pizza rustica, we’ve always relied on the same vintage recipe from McCall’s Cooking School, which simply requires sweet Italian sausage and prosciutto.

The page has a few notes scrawled on it—we use olive oil instead of the requisite salad oil, switch homemade pastry dough for pre-made, and add salami because the one thing Italian meat pie could always use more of is meat. (And, yeah, we skip the decorative dough leaves on top, too.) Even with the shortcuts, what comes out of the oven is so marvelously, consistently delicious that I can’t imagine making it any other way. 

If you cut out the dough-making steps and buy store-bought, the ingredient list is pretty short: olive oil, sweet Italian sausages, eggs (some raw, some hard-boiled), ricotta cheese, grated mozzarella cheese, grated Parmesan cheese, salami, prosciutto, parsley, black pepper, and a little bit of water. Our version starts by browning crumbled sausages in a skillet and setting them aside, and then, beating eggs in a bowl. Next, you pile in all three cheeses, the sausage, parsley, black pepper, and deli meats, which should be coarsely chopped. 

It’s quicker work, of course, if you’re able to divvy up the duties. One to cook the sausage, one to preside over the hard-boiled eggs, perhaps another to slice the prosciutto and salami. For the first few years, my mom made the pie on her own, and I remember watching her go through the motions before I, too, joined the assembly line. I’m so glad that I did�yond wanting to help her out, it’s created a nice set of memories, and new ones to look forward to each year: the meditative chopping, the smell of the sausage cooking, the mini dance breaks. It’s a warm feeling, creating something together with someone you love.

After the filling’s mixed together, all that’s left to do is assemble the pie and bake. A layer of pastry dough goes into the pie pan first, and then the meat and egg mixture. You’re probably wondering where those hard-boiled eggs come in—now’s the time. With a spoon, you create indentations into the filling and place a whole egg, shell removed, in each, forming a circle like the picture above. You’ll then swath them with a little more filling and the final layer of pastry dough, crimping the edges and sealing everything in kind of like a quiche sandwich. (At least, that’s how I think of it.) With a brush of egg yolk for color and a few slits cut for ventilation, the pie’s ready to bake. 

35 to 40 minutes later, the glorious, golden pizza rustica emerges. It’s tempting to cut into it as soon as it’s cool enough to eat, and some recipes do call for serving it warm, including our own. But we like to prepare it the day beforehand and then eat cold slices for Easter breakfast—something about letting the ingredients meld together in the fridge overnight really enhances the flavors. Savory sausage, prosciutto, and salami brightness from the parsley butteriness from the crust. One hearty slice will be definitely be enough to carry you well into the afternoon, and you’re pretty much guaranteed to have some leftovers as well. Those were often my favorite part—when I was younger, I𠆝 take a wedge of pie and proudly tote it to school in Tupperware for lunch.

Middle school turned to high school, high school turned to college—my parents would graciously bring pre-made pie with them for Easter visits𠅊nd college turned to work, where yes, I’ve still packed leftover pie for lunch the past few years. It’s a tradition I look forward to as much as making cookies for Christmas and fresh pesto for summer. And in these uncertain times, it’s a comforting and familiar routine to fall back on. I won’t be packing leftovers to go anywhere this year, of course. But I’ll be enjoying them with my family, and for that, I’m incredibly thankful.


Video: RUSTIC PIZZA using King Arthur Whole Wheat Flour. (August 2022).