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Candied Carrot Coins

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Ingredients

  • 2 medium carrots, scrubbed, very thinly sliced on a mandoline
  • 2 tablespoons sugar, plus more

Recipe Preparation

  • Bring carrots, 2 Tbsp. sugar, and ¼ cup water to a simmer in a medium skillet over medium-low heat, stirring to separate carrots. Cook until carrots are soft, about 5 minutes. Increase heat to medium and cook, stirring, until liquid is reduced to a thick syrup (if syrup starts to color, reduce heat). Add several generous pinches of sugar, tossing constantly, then cook, tossing, until carrots are coated. Spread out on a parchment-lined baking sheet and let cool.

  • Separate carrots with your fingers and toss each piece in more sugar to coat.

  • Do Ahead: Carrots can be made 1 day ahead. Store tightly wrapped at room temperature. Toss in sugar before using.

Nutritional Content

Calculated for 12 servings: Calories (kcal) 15 Fat (g) 0 Saturated Fat (g) 0 Cholesterol (mg) 0 Carbohydrates (g) 3 Dietary Fiber (g) 0 Total Sugars (g) 3 Protein (g) 0 Sodium (mg) 5Reviews SectionGreat resipe thanks claire!Vinny DWashington 04/18/20

Slow Cooker Honey Glazed Carrots

Set it and forget it with these sweet and savory Slow Cooker Glazed Carrots with Brown Sugar! In less than five minutes you can have this quick, easy, and healthy side dish prepped and ready to cook in your Crock-Pot. Baby carrots are cooked in a brown sugar, honey, and butter sauce for the best carrot recipe that can be served for a weeknight dinner, Easter lunch, or holiday meal.


Honey Brown Sugar Glazed Carrots

Just in time for Thanksgiving, these honey brown sugar glazed carrots have to be the easiest side dish I&rsquove ever made for a holiday. Truth be told, I made these carrots last year, not expecting them to go over big in my family.

They have told me repeatedly over the years that they don&rsquot like cooked carrots. But then I made these and they quickly changed their minds. It must have something to do with the butter, honey and brown sugar

I will also admit that I&rsquom not fond of baby carrots, usually finding them dried out with a slight oft-putting taste. That said, I use baby carrots here for convenience AND I&rsquom super picky about the package I buy. Look over the selection and pick a bag that looks good!! You can see if they are white, discolored and dried out. I&rsquove even tracked down the produce guy and asked for fresher ones from the back. Ask, they&rsquoll do it.

HOW TO MAKE GLAZED CARROTS WITH HONEY AND BROWN SUGAR

These carrots could not be easier. Rinse and dry the carrots, melt some butter in a skillet, toss in the carrots and add some honey and brown sugar. That&rsquos it. Just stir and cook until tender, season with a little salt and finish the glazed carrots off with a sprinkling of fresh thyme. These carrots are so good!

Did you know cooked carrots are more nutritious than raw carrots? They really are, another plus for making these glazed carrots. They are perfect for the holidays and my kids polish them off. Everyone needs an easy, uncomplicated side for the big meal

this is mine. Oh, and the Best Brussels Sprouts on the planet, at least we think so. Honey makes everything taste better! Kelly🍴🐦

HUNGRY FOR MORE ? Subscribe to my Newsletter and come hang out with me on INSTAGRAM , or give me a follow on FACEBOOK or see what I&rsquom pinning on PINTEREST .


Zoe Francois makes Candied Carrot Peel

When life gives 'Zoë Bakes Cakes' author Zoë François veggie scraps, she makes this stunning cake decoration: spiced, candied carrot peel.

On Play Me a Recipe, your favorite cooks will walk you through their most treasured recipes, offering all the insider tips, stories, and tricks you won't get from a written recipe—and you'll be right alongside them, every step of the way. Feel free to pause, jump back, or navigate the steps via the podcast chapters.

If you're cooking along, here's the recipe we're making today. Go ahead and grab the ingredients below (Zoë starts listing them at 1:03) before starting the episode.

1 cup (240 milliliters) simple syrup1 tablespoon orange blossom water, or 1/2 teaspoon orange extract1 pinch kosher saltPeels from 2 pounds (900 grams) organic carrots, washedPreheat the oven to 200°F / 95°C. Line a baking sheet with a silicone baking mat.In a saucepan over medium-low heat, stir together the simple syrup, orange blossom water, and salt and warm to a gentle simmer. Add the carrot peels and cook just until the peels are turning translucent.Strain the peels in a fine-mesh sieve and then lay them out on the prepared baking sheet.Bake until the carrot peels start to curl up, anywhere from 30 to 60 minutes, depending on their thickness. Then turn the oven temperature to 100°F / 40°C and bake until completely dry this can take several hours.Transfer to an airtight container and store in a cool, dry place for up to 48 hours.

Episoder

Either Side Eaters: What Makes Food Go Viral? With Sophia Roe

Find more Either Side Eaters episodes here.

Either Side Eaters: Aperitif AKA The Happiest Hour With Rachel Khoo

If you like this show, head right on over to the Either Side Eaters show page, where you can find more episodes.

Jen Phanomrat and Katie Quinn talk about the history of aperitivo, aka apéritif, aka fika. They also talk about airplane food, ice cubes in wine, and how Apéritif author Rebekah Pebbler and Food Network TV personality Rachel Khoo craft Friday coziness affordably.

Special thanks to our listeners for your questions and Brian Quinn (@bqfunk) for our theme music.

Eden Grinshpan makes Poached Eggs with Freekeh Tabouleh, Harissa & Yogurt

Top Chef Canada host and Eating Out Loud author Eden Grinshpan dices, poaches, and swooshes her way through this Turkish-inspired poached eggs recipe with harissa and tabbouleh.

On Play Me a Recipe, your favorite cooks will walk you through their most treasured recipes, offering all the insider tips, stories, and tricks you won't get from a written recipe—and you'll be right alongside them, every step of the way. Feel free to pause, jump back, or navigate the steps via the podcast chapters (if you're in Apple Podcasts, swipe up on the episode player page—the podcast chapters will be at the bottom).

If you're cooking along, here's the recipe we're making today. Go ahead and grab the ingredients below (Eden starts listing them at 4:25) before starting the episode.

Poached Eggs with Freekeh Tabouleh, Harissa & Yogurt

Poached Eggs with Freekeh Tabbouleh

1 teaspoon kosher salt2 tablespoons distilled white vinegar4 large eggs1/4 cup plain yogurt with a large pinch of salt2 tablespoons harissa, store-bought or homemade, plus more as neededFreekeh-Celery Tabbouleh (below)Aleppo pepper or red chile flakesFlaky sea salt

2 cups cooked cracked freekeh2 cups chopped fresh parsley2 cups chopped fresh dill2 celery stalks, finely diced1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oilGrated zest and juice of 1 lemon1 teaspoon kosher salt

Poached Eggs with Freekeh Tabbouleh

Fill a medium pot with about 5 inches of water and add the kosher salt. Bring the water to a boil over medium-high heat. Add the vinegar and create a gentle vortex in the water by swirling it in a circle with a spoon. Reduce the heat to low and carefully crack the eggs into the water one at a time. Continue gently stirring in a circular motion to keep the egg whites from getting too wispy. Cook for 3 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the eggs to a plate lined with paper towels to drain.Schmear the bottom of two bowls with the lemony yogurt (about a couple tablespoons each), then top with 2 poached eggs. Drizzle with the harissa (I like using the oil that settles on top—use more than you think you need). Mound the tabbouleh next to the eggs, sprinkle everything with Aleppo and sea salt, and serve

In a large bowl, mix together the freekeh, parsley, dill, and celery. Add the olive oil, lemon zest, lemon juice, and salt and mix once more to combine.

Is there a recipe you'd like to hear us make? Email it to us at [email protected]

Lobby Time Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Either Side Eaters: Ketchup's History Is Bananas With Frankie Celenza

Who knew ketchup could be so controversial? Co-hosts Katie Quinn and Jen Phanomrat are joined by Tastemade's Frankie Celenza to discuss which foods are OK to smother in the stuff, catsup's surprising original formula (hint: no tomato), banana ketchup (!), homemade ketchup (!!), and why Heinz has remained king.

You can find Frankie's Tastemade show, Struggle Meals, on most streaming platforms, or follow his kitchen adventures on Instagram at @frankiecooks.

Special thanks to listeners for your questions and Brian Quinn (@bqfunk) for our theme music. Have a Q for us? Send us a voice memo for a chance to be featured.

Find more Either Side Eaters episodes here.

Counterjam: The Genius Flavors of NYC

On this episode, The Genius Recipe Tapes host Kristen Miglore goes behind the scenes with Counterjam's host Peter J. Kim. How did he know to ask A Tribe Called Quest's Jarobi White and multiplatinum icon Kelis—both musicians-turned-chefs—for their sleeper-hit NYC joints? And, what, if anything, is the Big Apple's cuisine defined by?

Find more Counterjam episodes here season 2 will look at Mexican, Jewish, Ethiopian, and French food and music featuring guests like Broad City creator Ilana Glazer, comedian Felipe Esparza, and Top Chef favorite Mory Sacko. It's an absolute audible feast—we hope to see you there!

Either Side Eaters: Breakfast! With Zoe Kelly

Quick: are you a pancakes or eggs benny person? Congee or oats?

Filipino-Thai New Yorker Jen Phanomrat grew up with silog for breakfast Katie Quinn's Midwestern household usually had cereal. On this episode, they discuss breakfast traditions across the world, and discover many surprising universalities. They're joined by Chef and Founder of Little Chef & Me Zoe Kelly, who shares a dunktastic idea we'll be making our new morning tradition.

Special thanks to our listeners Clifton and Janet (@JustJanet69) for your questions, and Brian Quinn (@bqfunk) for our theme music.

Have a Q for us? Send us a voice memo for a chance to be featured.

Find more Either Side Eaters episodes here.

Molly Baz makes Cae Sal 6/4

On Play Me a Recipe, your favorite cooks will walk you through their most treasured recipes, offering all the insider tips, stories, and tricks you won't get from a written recipe—and you'll be right alongside them, every step of the way. Feel free to pause, jump back, or navigate the steps via the podcast chapters (if you're in Apple Podcasts, swipe up on the episode player page—the podcast chapters will be at the bottom).

If you're cooking along, here's the recipe we're making today. Go ahead and grab the ingredients below (Molly starts listing them at 2:16) before starting the episode.

Molly Baz's Cae Sal
Serves 4

1 garlic clove1 lemon4 romaine hearts

2 large eggs2 ounces grated Parmesan cheese (about 1/2 cup), plus more for serving

1/2 crusty baguette (about 6 ounces)2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oilKosher saltCoarsely ground black pepper4 oil-packed anchovy fillets1 teaspoon Dijon mustard1/2 cup canola or vegetable oil1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauceMake the croutons: Preheat the oven to 350°F. Tear 1/2 of a baguette into irregular 1-inch pieces you should end up with about 3 cups of torn bread. Toss on a rimmed baking sheet with 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, and a few good cranks of black pepper until well coated. Bake until deeply golden brown and crisp, 12 to 14 minutes. Let cool.Make the dressing:*
Separate the yolks and whites of 2 large eggs. Place the yolks in a large bowl (where you’ll build your dressing) and reserve the whites for another use.
Finely grate 1 garlic clove and the zest of about half of a lemon into the large bowl. Squeeze in the juice of half of the lemon.
Finely chop 4 anchovies, then mash them to a paste, using the side of a chef’s knife until homogeneous add to the large bowl.
Add 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard and whisk everything to combine. Place a damp kitchen towel underneath the bowl to stabilize it so it doesn’t slip ’n’ slide all over the place as you whisk in the oil.
Starting with a very thin stream at first, whisking constantly as you go, incorporate ½ cup of canola oil into the yolk mixture until it is thick, creamy, and pale yellow.
Whisk in 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, 3/4 teaspoon black pepper, 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce, and 1 ounce grated Parmesan cheese (1/4 cup). Taste the dressing on a leaf of romaine—it should be salty, cheesy, and lemony. Make any adjustments necessary until it tastes so good that you’d be happy eating a bowl of it alone with aside of crouts.

*You are about to make mayonnaise by hand, BUT it’s not as hard as it sounds. The mustard, garlic, and anchovies that get mixed into the egg yolk will help support the emulsion.
Prep the lettuce: Tear the leaves of 4 romaine hearts into 2-inch pieces and transfer them to the bowl of dressing. Squeeze the juice of half of the lemon over the romaine, season with salt, and toss the leaves to coat, avoiding incorporating any of the dressing beneath just yet.**

**It’s always a good idea to preseason your greens with some acid and salt so they are zippy and zingy and hold up to the dressing. The lettuce contains water, which is going to dilute the flavor of the dressing, so you’ll always need a little extra acid to combat that.
Serve: Add the croutons and gently toss the lettuce with your hands until well coated. Add 1 ounce grated Parmesan cheese (1/4 cup) and toss again. Divide among plates and top with more grated Parmesan and black pepper.

How did your Cae Sal turn out? We want to hear all about it—leave us a rating + review!

Lobby Time Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Counterjam: Breaking the Bento Box with Yumi Nagashima, G Yamazawa & Dan the Automator

In honor of Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we're sharing an episode of Food52 Podcast Resident Peter J. Kim's food-meets-music show, Counterjam.

Relationships with teriyaki, sushi stereotypes, and the immigrant hustle—host Peter J. Kim looks at Japanese-American cultural identity with comedian Yumi Nagashima, rapper G Yamazawa, and producer Dan the Automator.

Check out Counterjam on Spotify for bonus playlists featuring tracks from Yumi, G, Dan and so many other wonderful Japanese-American artists!

Counterjam Season 2 is out NOW—check out the show page for new episodes.

Either Side Eaters: Chicken or the Egg With Julie Nolke

New-Yorker-for-life Jen keeps her eggs in her fridge Katie, who's now in Puglia, used to but now doesn't—as per her Egg Guy's (yup) recommendation. We look at which cultures chill vs. not, what makes an egg brown or white (and orange-yolked!), if a "proper" omelet even exists, and consult very special guest, Canadian actress and comedian Julie Nolke on her breakfast feelings.

Check out Julie's vids on YouTube, or follow her @julienolke on Instagram and @juliemarienolke on Twitter.

Special thanks to Michelle (@Michelle_MadisonTV) for your question and Brian Quinn (@bqfunk) for our theme music. Send us a voice memo for a chance to be featured!

Find more Either Side Eaters episodes here.

Kristen Miglore makes Tony Kim's "Cacio" e Pepe

On Play Me a Recipe, your favorite cooks will walk you through their most treasured recipes, offering all the insider tips, stories, and tricks you won't get from a written recipe—and you'll be right alongside them, every step of the way. Feel free to pause, jump back, or navigate the steps via the podcast chapters.

If you're cooking along, here's the recipe we're making today. Go ahead and grab the ingredients below (Kristen starts listing them at 1:52) before starting the episode.

Kosher salt, to taste1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon unsalted butter, softened2 teaspoons white miso1/2 cup chicken stock, plus more as needed1/2 teaspoon freshly ground Sichuan pepper (or to taste), plus more for garnish**1/2 teaspoon freshly ground white pepper (or to taste), plus more for garnish**1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper (or to taste), plus more for garnish**1 portion fresh ramen noodles (or dry ramen noodles in a pinch)Bring a pot of well-salted water to a boil over high heat. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, mash together the butter and miso with a fork until smooth.Melt the miso butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the chicken stock, Sichuan pepper, white pepper, and black pepper, and bring to a boil.Add the noodles into the boiling pot of water and cook until they are relaxed but still firmer than al dente, since they’ll continue cooking in the sauce, about 1 to 2 minutes.Using chopsticks or tongs, lift the noodles out of the water and into the miso butter sauce. Stir and toss the noodles in the sauce until the noodles are cooked through and the sauce is thickened, about 1–2 more minutes, adding a little bit more chicken stock if the sauce gets too thick. The noodles should be lightly coated in a buttery, peppery sheen. Taste, add a pinch of salt if needed, toss one more time, and heap onto a plate. Sprinkle lightly with each of the peppers, and serve immediately.**Tony Kim's original recipe called for a teaspoon of each type of pepper, which I wimpily scaled back—because I know some of you will be as wimpy as me (though the Roman chef Marco Baccanelli does describe traditional cacio e pepe as "violent," so a tablespoon of pepper isn't out of place). Adjust the pepper amounts to your taste.

Is there a recipe you'd like to hear us make? Email it to us at [email protected]!

Lobby Time Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Either Side Eaters: Halloumi Is Hella Good

Either Side Eaters co-hosts, Just Eats Life's Jen Phanomrat (and New Yorker for life!) and expat-in-Europe Katie Quinn, look at the hella complicated history of halloumi, and talk through some recipe ideas for this squidgy, oh-so-versatile cheese. Here's the recipe that Jen mentions:

6 tablespoons oil14 ounces halloumi, cubed4 tablespoons massaman curry paste1 tablespoon tomato paste1 tablespoon light brown sugar1/2 large onion, sliced4 garlic cloves, minced2 cups russet potato, peeled and large diced1/2 cup carrots, peeled and sliced into rounds3 tablespoons fish sauce2 (13.5-ounce) cans coconut milk2 whole dried Thai chilis1 cinnamon stick1/4 cup roasted salted peanutsSteamed white rice, for servingHeat the oil in a large pan on medium heat. Working in batches, brown the halloumi on all sides, about 10 minutes, remove and then set aside.Turn the heat up to medium-high and stir the massaman paste and tomato paste into the oil. Add light brown sugar, onion, and garlic and cook until the onion is softened. Add potatoes, carrots, fish sauce, coconut milk, chilis, and cinnamon stick. Stir well, cover, and lower the heat to medium. Cook until the potatoes and carrots are tender, about 10 minutes.Stir in the halloumi and peanuts and cook for another 5 minutes uncovered.Serve with steamed white rice.

Special thanks to our listeners for your questions and Brian Quinn (@bqfunk) for our theme music.

Have a Q for us? Send us a voice memo for a chance to be featured.

Laurel Galluci & Claire Thomas make Margherita Pizza

This 5-ingredient recipe for gluten-, grain-, and dairy-free pizza comes from Sweet Laurel co-owners and -authors Laurel Galluci and Claire Thomas. It's a simple, easy recipe the two moms love to make with their kids—and they hope you enjoy, too!

On Play Me a Recipe, your favorite cooks will walk you through their most treasured recipes, offering all the insider tips, stories, and tricks you won't get from a written recipe—and you'll be right alongside them, every step of the way. Feel free to pause, jump back, or navigate the steps via the podcast chapters (if you're in Apple Podcasts, swipe up on the episode player page—the podcast chapters will be at the bottom).

If you're cooking along, here's the recipe we're making today. Go ahead and grab the ingredients below (Claire and Laurel starts listing them at 5:20) before starting the episode.

Margherita Pizza
makes one 10-inch pizza

Pizza Dough (below)1/4 cup Sicilian Tomato Sauce (below) or store-bought1 cup 1 1/2-inch cubes Dairy-Free Mozzarella (below) or store-boughtFresh basil, for garnishPreheat the oven to 500°F. If you have a pizza stone, place it directly on the oven rack while it preheats. If not, place an inverted baking sheet on the oven rack while the oven preheats. The baking sheet will get very hot and provide a crispy bottom crust.On a counter, place the dough on a sheet of parchment, cover with another piece of parchment paper, and gently roll out into a large circle, about 10 inches in diameter and 1/8-inch thick. Using your fingers, pinch the edge of the pizza dough into a small lip. Spread the sauce over the pizza dough, but not the lip, and sprinkle with the mozzarella and fresh basil. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, until the dough is deep golden brown at the edges.

Pizza Dough
makes one 10-inch crust

1 1/2 cups almond flour1 cup arrowroot powder, plus more for dusting1/2 teaspoon Himalayan pink salt1/4 cup coconut yogurt, homemade (see page 26) or store-bought1/2 cup unsweetened almond milkIn a medium bowl, combine the almond flour, arrowroot, and salt. Slowly stir in the coconut yogurt and almond milk and mix with a wooden spoon until a soft dough forms, about 1 minute.Place a large piece of parchment paper on a flat surface and sprinkle it with arrowroot. Turn out the dough onto the parchment and roll it out to a 10-inch round. Use as directed in our pizza recipes, our wrap tightly in plastic wrap and store in the freezer for up to 3 months. Thaw frozen dough overnight in the fridge before using.

Sicilian Tomato Sauce
makes 3 cups

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil3 garlic cloves, minced1/2 teaspoon Himalyan pink salt2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper1 (24-ounce) can crushed tomatoes3 ounces tomato paste2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, chopped2 teaspoons fresh basil, chopped1 whole clovePinch of red pepper flakes1/2 teaspoon pure maple syrupHeat the olive oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. When the oil is shimmering, add the garlic and toast very lightly, about 30 seconds. Reduce the heat to low and add the salt, black pepper, tomatoes, tomato paste, rosemary, basil, clove, red pepper flakes, maple syrup, and 1 cup water. Cover and simmer for about 1 hour, until bubbling and thickened. Remove the clove and, if desired, blend the sauce in a high-speed blender until smooth, about 1 minute.Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 1 week or freeze for up to 3 months.

Dairy-Free Mozzarella
makes 1 cup

1/3 cup cassava flour1 cup full-fat canned coconut milk2 tablespoons coconut oil2 teaspoons cider vinegar1 teaspoon Himalayan pink saltIn a medium bowl, stir together 3/4 cup water and the cassava flour until smooth.In a medium saucepan, combine the coconut milk, coconut oil, vinegar, and salt, and cook over low heat, stirring, until the mixture is evenly combined and slightly warm, about 4 minutes.Slowly stir the flour mixture into the coconut milk mixture and cook, stirring continuously, until thick and pulling away from the edges of the pan, about 7 minutes. Pour the mixture into a glass container, cover, and refrigerate for at least 3 hours, until it has solidified.Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 5 days.

Is there a recipe you'd like to hear us make? Email it to us at [email protected]d52.com!


When storing your carrots prior to cooking, remove the green tops. According to the University of Illinois Extension, this greenery robs the carrot of nutrients. Carrots can be stored in the crisper for several weeks prior to cooking.

While these Japanese carrots are a popular side dish at Japanese restaurants, they are equally appropriate to serve with a roast, grilled fish or chicken, or barbecued ribs.

Combine carrots with other root vegetables and squashes, such as parsnips, turnips and acorn or butternut squash, before adding the glaze. Cut all the vegetables into pieces of a similar size.

If you're watching your sugar intake, try healthy baby carrot recipes by using unsweetened orange juice, ground ginger and sugar substitute, as described by the University of Illinois Extension.


Quick-Glazed Carrots

One of the most useful recipes ever and, sadly, one that is often overlooked. Carrots cooked this way are terrific hot, warm, or at room temperature (use oil instead of butter if you plan to serve them less than hot?which also makes them vegan) and take to a wide variety of herbs and other simple treatments. If you can find real baby carrots – the very thin ones – just trim them quickly (don't even bother to peel them) they'll be super.

Use oil instead of butter and the carrots are vegan. Other vegetables you can use: parsnips or turnips.

1 pound carrots, more or less, cut into coins or sticks
2 tablespoons butter or extra virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice (optional)
Chopped fresh parsley, dill, mint, basil, or chervil leaves for garnish (optional)

1. Combine all the ingredients except the garnish in a saucepan no more than 6 inches across add about 1/3 cup water (or white wine or stock). Bring to a boil, then cover and adjust the heat so the mixture simmers.

2. Cook, more or less undisturbed, until the carrots are tender and the liquid is pretty much gone, 10 to 20 minutes. Uncover and boil off the remaining liquid, then add the lemon juice if you're using it. Taste and adjust the seasoning serve hot, or within an hour or two, garnished with the herb if you like.

Quick-Glazed Carrots with Orange and Ginger. Not much more work but sexier and far more impressive: Add 1 tablespoon minced or grated peeled fresh ginger to the initial mix use freshly squeezed orange juice in place of water. Garnish with a teaspoon or more of grated orange and/or lemon zest.

Balsamic-Glazed Carrots with Garlic. Another variation that doesn't take much but is amazing: Use balsamic vinegar in place of the water and add 5 to 10 whole cloves of peeled garlic along with the carrots. Proceed as above, adding water if the mixture dries out before the carrots are done.

5 Ways to Jazz Up Quick-Glazed Carrots

1. 1/2 cup or so of chopped onion, shallot, scallion, or leeks.

2. Add 1/2 cup or so of chopped pitted dates, raisins, dried currants, or dried tomatoes.

3. Whisk together 1 tablespoon soy sauce and 1 tablespoon miso, then stir this into the carrots just as they're done.

(Use sake as the glazing liquid instead of the water if you have it.)

4. Add 1 cup or so peas, snow peas, or snap peas along with the carrots (thawed frozen are fine).

5. Add a tablespoon or so of any mild chile paste (one made with ancho chiles would be ideal).


Honey Roasted Carrots

I made these Honey Roasted Carrots for my husband and I the other day for an easy side with lunch. I’ve made Simple Maple Roasted Vegetables for dinner before but never just roasted carrots. I do love carrots, but really I usually eat them raw, or my Mom’s Candied Carrots at the holidays, or as a base to a soup. I’ve been missing out. They’re soooo good.

Honey Roasted Carrots are so easy to make also. So that pretty much makes them a new staple in my house. It tastes like you’re eating candy but it’s carrots! Roasting them caramelizes the natural sugars and the honey just throws them over the top. I like the combination of the salt and garlic with the sweetness of the honey. If you haven’t noticed that’s a favorite combination of mine. These carrots won a stamp of approval from my husband and I know that they’ll be a new favorite in your home too!


5 Delicious Air Fryer Carrots Recipes

Recipe 1: Air Fryer Carrots And Potatoes

This recipe is my favorite side dish when serving meat dishes, like pot roasts and crispy pork chops. It’s simple, delicious, and healthy.

What You’ll Need

Air fryer: I use the Instant Vortex Air Fryer, but you can use any air fryer that you have at home.

Carrots (1/2 lb): Baby carrots work well in this recipe because they tend to be sweeter than regular carrots and you don’t need to cut them up into smaller pieces. If you only have regular carrots in your pantry, cut them thickly into pieces.

Potatoes (1/2 lb): To pair well with your baby carrots, you need those small fingerling potatoes. The flavor is quite similar to regular potatoes and they’re firm enough to hold up well to frying.

Seasonings: A tablespoon of salt and 1/2 tablespoon of pepper will do. But if you want to be fancy, consider adding a 1/2 tablespoon each of garlic powder, onion powder, and Italian seasoning.

Cooking oil (1 tablespoon): Cooking in an air fryer still requires a little amount of oil to make the food moist and crispy. The best cooking oils for air frying are those with a high smoke point, like grapeseed, avocado, and olive oil.

Instructions

1. In a bowl, mix a little amount of cooking oil with the seasonings.

2. Toss the vegetables with the seasoning mix.

3. Transfer the seasoned vegetables into the air fryer basket.

4. Air fry for about 10 minutes or until the vegetables are browned according to your preference. I like my vegetables to be a bit soft and browned so 10 minutes is enough for me. If you like the vegetables to be firmer, cook less than 10 minutes.

5. Serve with your favorite meat dish and enjoy!

Recipe 2: Air Fryer Carrots With Brown Sugar

If you want something sweet, you can try to make these air fryer brown sugar roasted carrots. You can pair this recipe with any dishes.

What You’ll Need

Baby carrots (1 lb): Peel the carrots because I found that the skin gives them a slightly bitter taste. Use a vegetable peeler so you don’t remove much of the flesh. If you’re using regular carrots, cut them into 1-inch chunks.

Brown sugar (2 tablespoons): This will give the sweet flavor to the carrots.

Olive oil (2 tablespoons): This will give keep the carrots tender. If you want an extra flavor, use two tablespoons of melted butter as an alternative.

Bowl: Instead of putting the carrots straight into the air fryer basket, use a bowl to catch the sweet drippings.

Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

1. In a bowl, mix all the ingredients until the carrots are completely coated.

2. Air fry for 20-25 minutes at 380 degrees Fahrenheit. Stir halfway.

3. Serve and enjoy with any meal.

Recipe 3: Air Fryer Carrots With Other Vegetables

An air fryer is also good at roasting vegetables. You can air fry carrots with broccoli, asparagus, and zucchini. Total cooking time can last up to 30 minutes.

What You’ll Need

Vegetables (1 lb): You have a lot of options here. You can use carrots, broccoli, zucchini, and asparagus. Chop the vegetables evenly.

Cooking oil (1 tablespoon)

Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

1. With the preheated air fryer at 360 degrees Fahrenheit, put the vegetables into the frying basket and cook for 15-20 minutes.

2. Stir the vegetables every 5-8 minutes to cook evenly. You want them to be crispy in the outside and tender on the inside.

3. Once done, enjoy it with your preferred dipping sauce.

Recipe 4: Crispy Carrot Fries

Carrot fries without the grease? Yes, it’s possible with an air fryer. Carrots have fewer calories than sweet potatoes, making them a healthier option.

What You’ll Need

Carrots: Wash the carrots and cut them into fries.

Garlic ( 1 clove): A little bit of garlic will give a nice aroma and taste to the carrot fries.

Olive oil ( 1 tablespoon)

Salt to taste

Parmesan cheese (2 tablespoons): Fries tastes great with cheese. To cut down the calories and fat, use the reduced fat grated version.

Instructions

1. Crush the garlic and add a bit of salt and olive to create a paste.

2 In a bowl, mix the garlic paste with the carrots.

3. Add the grated Parmesan to the carrots.

4. Place the carrots in the air fryer basket in a single layer.

5. Cook for 15 minutes or so. Flip the carrots halfway to make sure that they’re cooked evenly. You want them to crispy on the outside and soft on the inside.

6. Once cooked, serve with your favorite dipping sauce.

Recipe 5: Air Fryer Whole Carrots

Another way of enjoying the carrots is to fry them whole in the air fryer.

What You’ll Need

Carrots (1 lb): You want to use larger carrots because they taste better when roasted. Baby carrots can also be a good alternative but they won’t taste similar to larger carrots.

Olive oil (2 tablespoons)

Garlic powder (1/2 teaspoon)

Paprika (1/2 teaspoon)

Parmesan cheese (1/2 cup): This will be the topping for your carrots.

Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

1. In a large bowl, mix the carrots with olive oil, garlic powder, and paprika.

2. Transfer them in the air fryer basket and cook for 20 minutes. Shake halfway through to cook evenly.

3. Once cooked, top with Parmesan cheese. Add some salt and pepper to taste.

Preheat the air fryer. You should preheat the air fryer before cooking to get optimum results. The food crisps up so nicely when you do this simple chore. Set the appliance at 400 degrees Fahrenheit around 3-5 minutes.

Don’t overcrowd the air fry basket. As much as you want the cooking time to be done quickly, you want to avoid overcrowding the basket. Give space to cook the food in a perfect crisp. Cook in batches if you’re cooking a lot of food.

Shake it. To make sure that your carrots are cooking evenly, shake the basket every few minutes.


Honey Glazed Carrots

Sometimes I spend my focus on the main meal and 3/4 the way through making the main dish I try to think up a quick side dish for my family. That’s how I came up with this recipe for Honey Glazed Carrots. It takes 15 minutes or less and is delicious!

I used frozen crinkle cut carrots but you can also use freshly sliced carrots or baby carrots.

Once the carrots are tender, you drain any water then add a little butter, honey, and brown sugar. Then season with salt and pepper and parsley if desired. Easy peasy!

These Honey Glazed Carrots will become your new favorite side dish! Easy, quick, and delicious! What more could you want?


Copper Pennies Carrot Salad

Just like pineapple, we southerners also love our sweet and sour dishes. From salads, to green beans, to pickles, that combination of flavor has long been a southern favorite and Copper Penny Carrots are another dish that falls into that category. Named so because they resemble pennies, it is a cold marinated salad of thinly sliced vegetables - carrots, sweet onion and sweet bell pepper - tossed and left to marinade in a hot, sweet and sour mixture of tomato, vinegar and seasonings. Also known as bronze pennies, they are as fabulous as a holiday side as they are at a barbecue, and perfect for the Easter table.

Even though they are loaded with flavor, they are super simple to make. You want the carrots to be fairly thin slices, though I don't like them paper thin so I cut them about 1/8 to 1/4-inch. Use a mandolin to make it an easy job. You'll also want to cook the carrots only to crisp-tender, but not mushy, so while you could use frozen and even canned, raw carrots shine best in this dish. I use the microwave, but you may also cook them any other way, including boiling them. Add a half of a Vidalia or other sweet onion, also thinly sliced. I prefer sweet onion, but use a stronger onion if you prefer, such as a purple onion.

Add half of a thinly sliced green bell pepper. Remove all of the ribs and slice the green pepper as thinly as you possibly can. Toss.

Heat the tomato soup marinade mixture to boiling, reduce and let simmer for about 5 minutes and pour the hot mixture over the vegetables.

Stir, cover and let it marinade in the refrigerator for 24 hours, removing and stirring occasionally. Use a slotted spoon to transfer to a serving dish and serve as a cold side salad. This salad will keep nicely in the marinade for several days, so you can make it ahead.

Pictured with about a pound of carrots.

Recipe: Copper Pennies Carrot Salad

  • 1 pound of raw carrots , peeled and sliced thin *
  • 1/2 of a medium Vidalia or other sweet onion , sliced very thin
  • 1/2 of a green bell pepper , sliced very thin
  • 1 can of condensed tomato soup
  • 3/4 cup of granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup of canola oil
  • 3/4 cup of apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon of Worcestershire , or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon of yellow mustard
  • 1 teaspoon each kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper , or to taste

Peel carrots, wash and cut them into thin rounds. You should have roughly 4 cups of sliced carrots. Place into a microwave safe bowl, add 2 tablespoons of water, cover and cook on high, about 7 minutes, or until crisp tender. Your microwave time may vary. Drain. Place into a medium to large glass bowl and top with the very thinly sliced sweet onion and bell pepper. Toss.

Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan, whisk together the tomato soup with all of the remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for about 5 minutes. Pour hot mixture over the vegetable mixture, cover and refrigerate for 24 hours, stirring occasionally.

Use a slotted spoon to transfer to a serving dish and serve as a cold side salad.

*Cook's Note: Carrots may be boiled if you prefer, just remember you only want them crisp tender, not mushy. Onion and bell pepper may also be diced. This marinade can take up to two pounds of sliced carrots, without increasing the marinade ingredients. Use a whole medium sized Vidalia onion and a whole green bell pepper, both thinly sliced, if you use two pounds of carrots. Substitute a stronger flavored onion, if you prefer. Purple onion is especially colorful. For a nice kick, include some chopped, pickled jalapeno. Though it's not traditional to me, I am told many families serve this as a hot side dish.

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