Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

The Daily Dish: This Brewery Is Making Beer From Sewer Water

The Daily Dish: This Brewery Is Making Beer From Sewer Water

This Brewery Is Making Beer From Sewer Water

Stone Brewing in California is making beer from recycled sewer water. The pale ale is appropriately called Full Circle, and is made with sewage water from the Pure Water San Diego demonstration plant as part of the city’s environmentally friendly plan to make one-third of its wastewater drinkable by 2035. And according to the local ABC News affiliate, Stone Brewery’s senior manager of brewing and innovation, Steve Gonzalez, is thrilled with the product. "Among the pale ales that I've made, it's probably in the top three,” he explained, adding that the beer has “some caramel notes, some tropical fruit notes” and is “a very clean-tasting beer."

For more, click here.

McDonald’s Is Slowly Replacing All of Its Frozen Burgers With Fresh Beef

After announcing a new test of fresh ground beef in November, the Golden Arches is expanding the test to include 328 restaurant locations in Texas. McDonald’s has historically always used frozen beef patties to make its burgers, but if all goes well, McDonald’s locations across the country could soon be serving fresh beef — as does the chain’s burger competitor, Wendy’s. This announcement comes on the heels of a tactical decision by McDonald’s to focus less on introducing healthier menu items (McDonald’s smoothie bowls anyone?) and more on improving the classic menu items they’ve had for years.

For more, click here.

Goodbye Boring Chocolate Eggs… Hello Easter Cheese Egg!

If endless parades of chocolate eggs are not your thing — behold! The magical Cheester Egg is here. Invented by U.K. blogger and devoted cheese enthusiast Annem Hobson, 27, who writes for the So Wrong It’s Nom blog, the Cheester Egg is a nine-ounce oval made of solid, crumbly, semi-hard cheese from Wildes Cheese, which was named London’s favorite cheese in 2015. The £14.95 ($18.66) Cheester Egg can be ordered online. (As a warning: They’re sold out right now due to popular demand, but we hope they will be restocked before Easter comes.)

For more, click here.

Sleep in Luxury on a $9,000 Bed at This Tokyo Nap Café

When it comes to themed cafés, Tokyo has had it all. The latest pop-up in Tokyo has transformed a local café into a dream world, and it’s perfect for the perpetually sleepy. In honor of World Sleep Day (which occurred on March 17), Nescafé and France Bed Co. collaborated to launch a nap café at Nescafé Harajuku, RocketNews24 reported. At the Nescafé x France Bed Sleep Café, customers can take a two-hour nap in three kinds of luxury electric reclining beds, including the “Bosutesso BO-08,” which retails for around $8,694, and the “RP1000DLX,” which retails for roughly $1,065. If you’re in Tokyo and looking to recharge during the day, the nap café will be open through March 26.

For more, click here.

Blue Buffalo Recalls Wet Dog Food for Potentially Elevated Levels of Hormones

Blue Buffalo, a company that aims to provide “the highest quality natural ingredients” in its pet food, has voluntarily recalled its “BLUE Wilderness Rocky Mountain Recipe Red Meat Dinner Wet Food for Adult Dogs” due to potentially elevated levels of “naturally occurring” beef thyroid hormones, according to the Food and Drug Administration. Long-term consumption of the hormone may bring about symptoms including vomiting, diarrhea, and rapid or difficult breathing. The recall is limited to one production lot of the wet food with UPC code 840243101153 and the “best by” date (which can be found on the bottom of the can) of June 7, 2019.

For more, click here.


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For the first time ever, scientists used original ingredients to recreate the most popular drink in the ancient world: beer.

Israeli archeologists found beer remains at various sites in the land of Israel. Locations include a 5,000-year-old Egyptian army outpost and an Egyptian brewery from 3,000 years ago, located in the heart of Tel Aviv. A third site, dating back 2,400 years, held beer remains from the Persian conquest of Israel. Perhaps, scientists posited, with the yeast extracted from the nano pores of the ceramic vessels that once held ancient beer, microbiologists could recreate the daily beverage of the Pharaohs.

Some archeologists believe that the pyramids in Egypt would not have been built without beer: Workers received between four to six liters a day to fill their bellies and to quench their thirst.

Photo credit Yoli Schwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoIn the ancient world, beer was a very common, everyday drink for all,&rdquo says Dr. Michael Klutstein, who together with Dr. Ronen Hazan, microbiologists at the Institute of Dental Medicine at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, led the research into the make-up and recreation of this ancient brew.

&ldquoBeer,&rdquo says Klutstein, &ldquowas one of the foundations of the ancient world&rsquos diet. Even small children drank it since water was unclean. The fermentation process in producing the beer decontaminated the water.&rdquo

Klutstein and Hazan gathered a team of scientists, archeologists, and local beer makers. Together they isolated a variety of yeasts hidden in the walls of the beer vessels, which they then revived and used to make new beer. So for the first time ever, beer was made from ancient yeast.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoWe didn&rsquot try to recreate the beer that the Pharaohs drank,&rdquo says Klutstein. &ldquoWe used a uniform, modern recipe for all of the yeast we extracted. But each type of ancient yeast resulted in a different taste profile for the beers we created. The next effort will be to use wheat and barley grown from ancient seeds, together with original pots and ancient brewing methods so that we can end up with the original taste.&rdquo

Now that they know that this 5,000-year-old yeast is viable for brewing beer, their goal is to recreate and, one day, sell ancient beer. Other ancient foodstuffs that can be recreated using this approach are foods that use yeast and bacteria like cheese, yogurt, and even certain kinds of pickles.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

The yeast from the Egyptian army outpost found in Israel comes from the same period in which, according to the Hebrew bible, the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. At this moment, only Israelis are involved in the beer project. &ldquoIt would be a dream if we could involve Egyptians in this, too,&rdquo Klutstein says.


Love Jewish food? Sign up for our Nosher recipe newsletter!

For the first time ever, scientists used original ingredients to recreate the most popular drink in the ancient world: beer.

Israeli archeologists found beer remains at various sites in the land of Israel. Locations include a 5,000-year-old Egyptian army outpost and an Egyptian brewery from 3,000 years ago, located in the heart of Tel Aviv. A third site, dating back 2,400 years, held beer remains from the Persian conquest of Israel. Perhaps, scientists posited, with the yeast extracted from the nano pores of the ceramic vessels that once held ancient beer, microbiologists could recreate the daily beverage of the Pharaohs.

Some archeologists believe that the pyramids in Egypt would not have been built without beer: Workers received between four to six liters a day to fill their bellies and to quench their thirst.

Photo credit Yoli Schwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoIn the ancient world, beer was a very common, everyday drink for all,&rdquo says Dr. Michael Klutstein, who together with Dr. Ronen Hazan, microbiologists at the Institute of Dental Medicine at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, led the research into the make-up and recreation of this ancient brew.

&ldquoBeer,&rdquo says Klutstein, &ldquowas one of the foundations of the ancient world&rsquos diet. Even small children drank it since water was unclean. The fermentation process in producing the beer decontaminated the water.&rdquo

Klutstein and Hazan gathered a team of scientists, archeologists, and local beer makers. Together they isolated a variety of yeasts hidden in the walls of the beer vessels, which they then revived and used to make new beer. So for the first time ever, beer was made from ancient yeast.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoWe didn&rsquot try to recreate the beer that the Pharaohs drank,&rdquo says Klutstein. &ldquoWe used a uniform, modern recipe for all of the yeast we extracted. But each type of ancient yeast resulted in a different taste profile for the beers we created. The next effort will be to use wheat and barley grown from ancient seeds, together with original pots and ancient brewing methods so that we can end up with the original taste.&rdquo

Now that they know that this 5,000-year-old yeast is viable for brewing beer, their goal is to recreate and, one day, sell ancient beer. Other ancient foodstuffs that can be recreated using this approach are foods that use yeast and bacteria like cheese, yogurt, and even certain kinds of pickles.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

The yeast from the Egyptian army outpost found in Israel comes from the same period in which, according to the Hebrew bible, the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. At this moment, only Israelis are involved in the beer project. &ldquoIt would be a dream if we could involve Egyptians in this, too,&rdquo Klutstein says.


Love Jewish food? Sign up for our Nosher recipe newsletter!

For the first time ever, scientists used original ingredients to recreate the most popular drink in the ancient world: beer.

Israeli archeologists found beer remains at various sites in the land of Israel. Locations include a 5,000-year-old Egyptian army outpost and an Egyptian brewery from 3,000 years ago, located in the heart of Tel Aviv. A third site, dating back 2,400 years, held beer remains from the Persian conquest of Israel. Perhaps, scientists posited, with the yeast extracted from the nano pores of the ceramic vessels that once held ancient beer, microbiologists could recreate the daily beverage of the Pharaohs.

Some archeologists believe that the pyramids in Egypt would not have been built without beer: Workers received between four to six liters a day to fill their bellies and to quench their thirst.

Photo credit Yoli Schwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoIn the ancient world, beer was a very common, everyday drink for all,&rdquo says Dr. Michael Klutstein, who together with Dr. Ronen Hazan, microbiologists at the Institute of Dental Medicine at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, led the research into the make-up and recreation of this ancient brew.

&ldquoBeer,&rdquo says Klutstein, &ldquowas one of the foundations of the ancient world&rsquos diet. Even small children drank it since water was unclean. The fermentation process in producing the beer decontaminated the water.&rdquo

Klutstein and Hazan gathered a team of scientists, archeologists, and local beer makers. Together they isolated a variety of yeasts hidden in the walls of the beer vessels, which they then revived and used to make new beer. So for the first time ever, beer was made from ancient yeast.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoWe didn&rsquot try to recreate the beer that the Pharaohs drank,&rdquo says Klutstein. &ldquoWe used a uniform, modern recipe for all of the yeast we extracted. But each type of ancient yeast resulted in a different taste profile for the beers we created. The next effort will be to use wheat and barley grown from ancient seeds, together with original pots and ancient brewing methods so that we can end up with the original taste.&rdquo

Now that they know that this 5,000-year-old yeast is viable for brewing beer, their goal is to recreate and, one day, sell ancient beer. Other ancient foodstuffs that can be recreated using this approach are foods that use yeast and bacteria like cheese, yogurt, and even certain kinds of pickles.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

The yeast from the Egyptian army outpost found in Israel comes from the same period in which, according to the Hebrew bible, the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. At this moment, only Israelis are involved in the beer project. &ldquoIt would be a dream if we could involve Egyptians in this, too,&rdquo Klutstein says.


Love Jewish food? Sign up for our Nosher recipe newsletter!

For the first time ever, scientists used original ingredients to recreate the most popular drink in the ancient world: beer.

Israeli archeologists found beer remains at various sites in the land of Israel. Locations include a 5,000-year-old Egyptian army outpost and an Egyptian brewery from 3,000 years ago, located in the heart of Tel Aviv. A third site, dating back 2,400 years, held beer remains from the Persian conquest of Israel. Perhaps, scientists posited, with the yeast extracted from the nano pores of the ceramic vessels that once held ancient beer, microbiologists could recreate the daily beverage of the Pharaohs.

Some archeologists believe that the pyramids in Egypt would not have been built without beer: Workers received between four to six liters a day to fill their bellies and to quench their thirst.

Photo credit Yoli Schwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoIn the ancient world, beer was a very common, everyday drink for all,&rdquo says Dr. Michael Klutstein, who together with Dr. Ronen Hazan, microbiologists at the Institute of Dental Medicine at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, led the research into the make-up and recreation of this ancient brew.

&ldquoBeer,&rdquo says Klutstein, &ldquowas one of the foundations of the ancient world&rsquos diet. Even small children drank it since water was unclean. The fermentation process in producing the beer decontaminated the water.&rdquo

Klutstein and Hazan gathered a team of scientists, archeologists, and local beer makers. Together they isolated a variety of yeasts hidden in the walls of the beer vessels, which they then revived and used to make new beer. So for the first time ever, beer was made from ancient yeast.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoWe didn&rsquot try to recreate the beer that the Pharaohs drank,&rdquo says Klutstein. &ldquoWe used a uniform, modern recipe for all of the yeast we extracted. But each type of ancient yeast resulted in a different taste profile for the beers we created. The next effort will be to use wheat and barley grown from ancient seeds, together with original pots and ancient brewing methods so that we can end up with the original taste.&rdquo

Now that they know that this 5,000-year-old yeast is viable for brewing beer, their goal is to recreate and, one day, sell ancient beer. Other ancient foodstuffs that can be recreated using this approach are foods that use yeast and bacteria like cheese, yogurt, and even certain kinds of pickles.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

The yeast from the Egyptian army outpost found in Israel comes from the same period in which, according to the Hebrew bible, the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. At this moment, only Israelis are involved in the beer project. &ldquoIt would be a dream if we could involve Egyptians in this, too,&rdquo Klutstein says.


Love Jewish food? Sign up for our Nosher recipe newsletter!

For the first time ever, scientists used original ingredients to recreate the most popular drink in the ancient world: beer.

Israeli archeologists found beer remains at various sites in the land of Israel. Locations include a 5,000-year-old Egyptian army outpost and an Egyptian brewery from 3,000 years ago, located in the heart of Tel Aviv. A third site, dating back 2,400 years, held beer remains from the Persian conquest of Israel. Perhaps, scientists posited, with the yeast extracted from the nano pores of the ceramic vessels that once held ancient beer, microbiologists could recreate the daily beverage of the Pharaohs.

Some archeologists believe that the pyramids in Egypt would not have been built without beer: Workers received between four to six liters a day to fill their bellies and to quench their thirst.

Photo credit Yoli Schwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoIn the ancient world, beer was a very common, everyday drink for all,&rdquo says Dr. Michael Klutstein, who together with Dr. Ronen Hazan, microbiologists at the Institute of Dental Medicine at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, led the research into the make-up and recreation of this ancient brew.

&ldquoBeer,&rdquo says Klutstein, &ldquowas one of the foundations of the ancient world&rsquos diet. Even small children drank it since water was unclean. The fermentation process in producing the beer decontaminated the water.&rdquo

Klutstein and Hazan gathered a team of scientists, archeologists, and local beer makers. Together they isolated a variety of yeasts hidden in the walls of the beer vessels, which they then revived and used to make new beer. So for the first time ever, beer was made from ancient yeast.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoWe didn&rsquot try to recreate the beer that the Pharaohs drank,&rdquo says Klutstein. &ldquoWe used a uniform, modern recipe for all of the yeast we extracted. But each type of ancient yeast resulted in a different taste profile for the beers we created. The next effort will be to use wheat and barley grown from ancient seeds, together with original pots and ancient brewing methods so that we can end up with the original taste.&rdquo

Now that they know that this 5,000-year-old yeast is viable for brewing beer, their goal is to recreate and, one day, sell ancient beer. Other ancient foodstuffs that can be recreated using this approach are foods that use yeast and bacteria like cheese, yogurt, and even certain kinds of pickles.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

The yeast from the Egyptian army outpost found in Israel comes from the same period in which, according to the Hebrew bible, the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. At this moment, only Israelis are involved in the beer project. &ldquoIt would be a dream if we could involve Egyptians in this, too,&rdquo Klutstein says.


Love Jewish food? Sign up for our Nosher recipe newsletter!

For the first time ever, scientists used original ingredients to recreate the most popular drink in the ancient world: beer.

Israeli archeologists found beer remains at various sites in the land of Israel. Locations include a 5,000-year-old Egyptian army outpost and an Egyptian brewery from 3,000 years ago, located in the heart of Tel Aviv. A third site, dating back 2,400 years, held beer remains from the Persian conquest of Israel. Perhaps, scientists posited, with the yeast extracted from the nano pores of the ceramic vessels that once held ancient beer, microbiologists could recreate the daily beverage of the Pharaohs.

Some archeologists believe that the pyramids in Egypt would not have been built without beer: Workers received between four to six liters a day to fill their bellies and to quench their thirst.

Photo credit Yoli Schwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoIn the ancient world, beer was a very common, everyday drink for all,&rdquo says Dr. Michael Klutstein, who together with Dr. Ronen Hazan, microbiologists at the Institute of Dental Medicine at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, led the research into the make-up and recreation of this ancient brew.

&ldquoBeer,&rdquo says Klutstein, &ldquowas one of the foundations of the ancient world&rsquos diet. Even small children drank it since water was unclean. The fermentation process in producing the beer decontaminated the water.&rdquo

Klutstein and Hazan gathered a team of scientists, archeologists, and local beer makers. Together they isolated a variety of yeasts hidden in the walls of the beer vessels, which they then revived and used to make new beer. So for the first time ever, beer was made from ancient yeast.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoWe didn&rsquot try to recreate the beer that the Pharaohs drank,&rdquo says Klutstein. &ldquoWe used a uniform, modern recipe for all of the yeast we extracted. But each type of ancient yeast resulted in a different taste profile for the beers we created. The next effort will be to use wheat and barley grown from ancient seeds, together with original pots and ancient brewing methods so that we can end up with the original taste.&rdquo

Now that they know that this 5,000-year-old yeast is viable for brewing beer, their goal is to recreate and, one day, sell ancient beer. Other ancient foodstuffs that can be recreated using this approach are foods that use yeast and bacteria like cheese, yogurt, and even certain kinds of pickles.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

The yeast from the Egyptian army outpost found in Israel comes from the same period in which, according to the Hebrew bible, the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. At this moment, only Israelis are involved in the beer project. &ldquoIt would be a dream if we could involve Egyptians in this, too,&rdquo Klutstein says.


Love Jewish food? Sign up for our Nosher recipe newsletter!

For the first time ever, scientists used original ingredients to recreate the most popular drink in the ancient world: beer.

Israeli archeologists found beer remains at various sites in the land of Israel. Locations include a 5,000-year-old Egyptian army outpost and an Egyptian brewery from 3,000 years ago, located in the heart of Tel Aviv. A third site, dating back 2,400 years, held beer remains from the Persian conquest of Israel. Perhaps, scientists posited, with the yeast extracted from the nano pores of the ceramic vessels that once held ancient beer, microbiologists could recreate the daily beverage of the Pharaohs.

Some archeologists believe that the pyramids in Egypt would not have been built without beer: Workers received between four to six liters a day to fill their bellies and to quench their thirst.

Photo credit Yoli Schwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoIn the ancient world, beer was a very common, everyday drink for all,&rdquo says Dr. Michael Klutstein, who together with Dr. Ronen Hazan, microbiologists at the Institute of Dental Medicine at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, led the research into the make-up and recreation of this ancient brew.

&ldquoBeer,&rdquo says Klutstein, &ldquowas one of the foundations of the ancient world&rsquos diet. Even small children drank it since water was unclean. The fermentation process in producing the beer decontaminated the water.&rdquo

Klutstein and Hazan gathered a team of scientists, archeologists, and local beer makers. Together they isolated a variety of yeasts hidden in the walls of the beer vessels, which they then revived and used to make new beer. So for the first time ever, beer was made from ancient yeast.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoWe didn&rsquot try to recreate the beer that the Pharaohs drank,&rdquo says Klutstein. &ldquoWe used a uniform, modern recipe for all of the yeast we extracted. But each type of ancient yeast resulted in a different taste profile for the beers we created. The next effort will be to use wheat and barley grown from ancient seeds, together with original pots and ancient brewing methods so that we can end up with the original taste.&rdquo

Now that they know that this 5,000-year-old yeast is viable for brewing beer, their goal is to recreate and, one day, sell ancient beer. Other ancient foodstuffs that can be recreated using this approach are foods that use yeast and bacteria like cheese, yogurt, and even certain kinds of pickles.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

The yeast from the Egyptian army outpost found in Israel comes from the same period in which, according to the Hebrew bible, the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. At this moment, only Israelis are involved in the beer project. &ldquoIt would be a dream if we could involve Egyptians in this, too,&rdquo Klutstein says.


Love Jewish food? Sign up for our Nosher recipe newsletter!

For the first time ever, scientists used original ingredients to recreate the most popular drink in the ancient world: beer.

Israeli archeologists found beer remains at various sites in the land of Israel. Locations include a 5,000-year-old Egyptian army outpost and an Egyptian brewery from 3,000 years ago, located in the heart of Tel Aviv. A third site, dating back 2,400 years, held beer remains from the Persian conquest of Israel. Perhaps, scientists posited, with the yeast extracted from the nano pores of the ceramic vessels that once held ancient beer, microbiologists could recreate the daily beverage of the Pharaohs.

Some archeologists believe that the pyramids in Egypt would not have been built without beer: Workers received between four to six liters a day to fill their bellies and to quench their thirst.

Photo credit Yoli Schwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoIn the ancient world, beer was a very common, everyday drink for all,&rdquo says Dr. Michael Klutstein, who together with Dr. Ronen Hazan, microbiologists at the Institute of Dental Medicine at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, led the research into the make-up and recreation of this ancient brew.

&ldquoBeer,&rdquo says Klutstein, &ldquowas one of the foundations of the ancient world&rsquos diet. Even small children drank it since water was unclean. The fermentation process in producing the beer decontaminated the water.&rdquo

Klutstein and Hazan gathered a team of scientists, archeologists, and local beer makers. Together they isolated a variety of yeasts hidden in the walls of the beer vessels, which they then revived and used to make new beer. So for the first time ever, beer was made from ancient yeast.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoWe didn&rsquot try to recreate the beer that the Pharaohs drank,&rdquo says Klutstein. &ldquoWe used a uniform, modern recipe for all of the yeast we extracted. But each type of ancient yeast resulted in a different taste profile for the beers we created. The next effort will be to use wheat and barley grown from ancient seeds, together with original pots and ancient brewing methods so that we can end up with the original taste.&rdquo

Now that they know that this 5,000-year-old yeast is viable for brewing beer, their goal is to recreate and, one day, sell ancient beer. Other ancient foodstuffs that can be recreated using this approach are foods that use yeast and bacteria like cheese, yogurt, and even certain kinds of pickles.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

The yeast from the Egyptian army outpost found in Israel comes from the same period in which, according to the Hebrew bible, the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. At this moment, only Israelis are involved in the beer project. &ldquoIt would be a dream if we could involve Egyptians in this, too,&rdquo Klutstein says.


Love Jewish food? Sign up for our Nosher recipe newsletter!

For the first time ever, scientists used original ingredients to recreate the most popular drink in the ancient world: beer.

Israeli archeologists found beer remains at various sites in the land of Israel. Locations include a 5,000-year-old Egyptian army outpost and an Egyptian brewery from 3,000 years ago, located in the heart of Tel Aviv. A third site, dating back 2,400 years, held beer remains from the Persian conquest of Israel. Perhaps, scientists posited, with the yeast extracted from the nano pores of the ceramic vessels that once held ancient beer, microbiologists could recreate the daily beverage of the Pharaohs.

Some archeologists believe that the pyramids in Egypt would not have been built without beer: Workers received between four to six liters a day to fill their bellies and to quench their thirst.

Photo credit Yoli Schwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoIn the ancient world, beer was a very common, everyday drink for all,&rdquo says Dr. Michael Klutstein, who together with Dr. Ronen Hazan, microbiologists at the Institute of Dental Medicine at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, led the research into the make-up and recreation of this ancient brew.

&ldquoBeer,&rdquo says Klutstein, &ldquowas one of the foundations of the ancient world&rsquos diet. Even small children drank it since water was unclean. The fermentation process in producing the beer decontaminated the water.&rdquo

Klutstein and Hazan gathered a team of scientists, archeologists, and local beer makers. Together they isolated a variety of yeasts hidden in the walls of the beer vessels, which they then revived and used to make new beer. So for the first time ever, beer was made from ancient yeast.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoWe didn&rsquot try to recreate the beer that the Pharaohs drank,&rdquo says Klutstein. &ldquoWe used a uniform, modern recipe for all of the yeast we extracted. But each type of ancient yeast resulted in a different taste profile for the beers we created. The next effort will be to use wheat and barley grown from ancient seeds, together with original pots and ancient brewing methods so that we can end up with the original taste.&rdquo

Now that they know that this 5,000-year-old yeast is viable for brewing beer, their goal is to recreate and, one day, sell ancient beer. Other ancient foodstuffs that can be recreated using this approach are foods that use yeast and bacteria like cheese, yogurt, and even certain kinds of pickles.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

The yeast from the Egyptian army outpost found in Israel comes from the same period in which, according to the Hebrew bible, the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. At this moment, only Israelis are involved in the beer project. &ldquoIt would be a dream if we could involve Egyptians in this, too,&rdquo Klutstein says.


Love Jewish food? Sign up for our Nosher recipe newsletter!

For the first time ever, scientists used original ingredients to recreate the most popular drink in the ancient world: beer.

Israeli archeologists found beer remains at various sites in the land of Israel. Locations include a 5,000-year-old Egyptian army outpost and an Egyptian brewery from 3,000 years ago, located in the heart of Tel Aviv. A third site, dating back 2,400 years, held beer remains from the Persian conquest of Israel. Perhaps, scientists posited, with the yeast extracted from the nano pores of the ceramic vessels that once held ancient beer, microbiologists could recreate the daily beverage of the Pharaohs.

Some archeologists believe that the pyramids in Egypt would not have been built without beer: Workers received between four to six liters a day to fill their bellies and to quench their thirst.

Photo credit Yoli Schwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoIn the ancient world, beer was a very common, everyday drink for all,&rdquo says Dr. Michael Klutstein, who together with Dr. Ronen Hazan, microbiologists at the Institute of Dental Medicine at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, led the research into the make-up and recreation of this ancient brew.

&ldquoBeer,&rdquo says Klutstein, &ldquowas one of the foundations of the ancient world&rsquos diet. Even small children drank it since water was unclean. The fermentation process in producing the beer decontaminated the water.&rdquo

Klutstein and Hazan gathered a team of scientists, archeologists, and local beer makers. Together they isolated a variety of yeasts hidden in the walls of the beer vessels, which they then revived and used to make new beer. So for the first time ever, beer was made from ancient yeast.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

&ldquoWe didn&rsquot try to recreate the beer that the Pharaohs drank,&rdquo says Klutstein. &ldquoWe used a uniform, modern recipe for all of the yeast we extracted. But each type of ancient yeast resulted in a different taste profile for the beers we created. The next effort will be to use wheat and barley grown from ancient seeds, together with original pots and ancient brewing methods so that we can end up with the original taste.&rdquo

Now that they know that this 5,000-year-old yeast is viable for brewing beer, their goal is to recreate and, one day, sell ancient beer. Other ancient foodstuffs that can be recreated using this approach are foods that use yeast and bacteria like cheese, yogurt, and even certain kinds of pickles.

Photo credit Yaniv Berman, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

The yeast from the Egyptian army outpost found in Israel comes from the same period in which, according to the Hebrew bible, the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. At this moment, only Israelis are involved in the beer project. &ldquoIt would be a dream if we could involve Egyptians in this, too,&rdquo Klutstein says.