Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

What to Drink Every Week of the Year: 52 Wines for 2016

What to Drink Every Week of the Year: 52 Wines for 2016

Hand-picked wines for each week of the year

The Daily Meal’s official list of wines to try in 2016.

For many people, the New Year represents a new beginning. For others, the turning of the calendar page means a whole new 12 months’ worth of wines to try.

What to Drink Every Week of the Year: 52 Wines for 2016 (Slideshow)

Here at the Daily Meal, we’re serious about our wine, so creating a weekly calendar of wine for the third year in a row is a task we were more than willing to take on. (You'll note that our recommendations start in early January; we wanted to give you a full catalogue of wines for 2016, and though the month is almost gone, the wines are still around.)

To compile our list, we asked our best sources — wine experts, authors, and contributors — to weigh in on wines they felt were worthy of this year’s line-up.

The list you are about to read is the web-based equivalent of your own personal sommelier, directing you through 52 weeks of tastings. This year’s list includes wines from producers all over the world, from 2013 Stony Hill Napa Valley Chardonnay from California to White Knight Prosecco from Italywith wines from Texas and Michigan making appearances as well.

This list includes wines in a wide range of prices, too. While there are inevitably some special bottles that only true connoisseurs will want to spend the money on, there are also wines on the list that won’t break the bank — ones that cost less than $20 a bottle. In short, there’s a wine here for everyone.

Editorial Note: Wine prices may vary.


The Spritz Is Truly the Drink of Summer—Here's Why

Aperol and beyond, the many variations of this bubbly refresher explained by the spritz expert.

While rosé will always have its place as a summer drink, the spritz has been giving pink wine a run for its money in recent years. The most well known version in the U.S. is the Aperol Spritz, but there are actually dozens of variations, and many trace their roots much farther back than the Aperol one. To get some spritz perspective, we spoke to sommelier Jordan Salcito, the creator of the uber-lovely and refreshing Ramona, one of the first canned wine spritzes on the market when it launched in back in 2016.

Salcito shared that spritzes can be traced as far back as the ancient Romans and Greeks. "Basically, it was considered very uncouth to be drunk at any meal, and the only one who was allowed to drink undiluted wine was Dionysus, the god of wine," she explains. "So it was quite common to add water, or even sea water to wine, and then there were various iterations of that involving adding honey, berries, and flowers." In slightly more modern times, the origin of the spritz is goes back to Northern Italy, when Austrians occupied the land under the Hapsburg Empire. Supposedly, they didn&apost like the taste of the wine there, so they began adding a "spritz" (German for spray) of water to make them more palatable, says Salcito. Today, all spritzes have bubbles, which happened in the early 20th century, as the drink continued to evolve.

"And then, the Italian futurist art movement—which was basically a rejection of the past and an embrace of technology and youth—gave way to the futurist cocktail movement," says Salcito. "It was about using new ingredients and having new flavors and doing things in a new way." Two of these new ingredients were Aperol ($28.99, wine.com) and Select (From $28.59, drizly.com), which joined Campari ($34.99, wine.com), and they were all bright red or orange bitter liqueurs that really made a statement. "It was eye-catching and well-marketed with the cool new advertisements that came along with the Futurist movement," says Salcito. Italians latched onto it, and the newest iteration of the Italian spritz was born, consisting of white wine, soda water, and a bitter liqueur.

Why bitter? Salcito thinks it comes from Italians&apos love of food. "There&aposs always a subtext with anything Italian, because so much about Italy has always been about food, dining, and drinking," she says. "The spritz is the perfect aperitivo because it is bitter, so it opens up one&aposs taste buds and is the perfect entry to a meal." And while Aperol existed, it wasn&apost nearly as popular as it is today. That happened in the 1990s, when the company went on an aggressive marketing campaign in certain parts of Northern Italy, around the time prosecco was added to the formula.


The Spritz Is Truly the Drink of Summer—Here's Why

Aperol and beyond, the many variations of this bubbly refresher explained by the spritz expert.

While rosé will always have its place as a summer drink, the spritz has been giving pink wine a run for its money in recent years. The most well known version in the U.S. is the Aperol Spritz, but there are actually dozens of variations, and many trace their roots much farther back than the Aperol one. To get some spritz perspective, we spoke to sommelier Jordan Salcito, the creator of the uber-lovely and refreshing Ramona, one of the first canned wine spritzes on the market when it launched in back in 2016.

Salcito shared that spritzes can be traced as far back as the ancient Romans and Greeks. "Basically, it was considered very uncouth to be drunk at any meal, and the only one who was allowed to drink undiluted wine was Dionysus, the god of wine," she explains. "So it was quite common to add water, or even sea water to wine, and then there were various iterations of that involving adding honey, berries, and flowers." In slightly more modern times, the origin of the spritz is goes back to Northern Italy, when Austrians occupied the land under the Hapsburg Empire. Supposedly, they didn&apost like the taste of the wine there, so they began adding a "spritz" (German for spray) of water to make them more palatable, says Salcito. Today, all spritzes have bubbles, which happened in the early 20th century, as the drink continued to evolve.

"And then, the Italian futurist art movement—which was basically a rejection of the past and an embrace of technology and youth—gave way to the futurist cocktail movement," says Salcito. "It was about using new ingredients and having new flavors and doing things in a new way." Two of these new ingredients were Aperol ($28.99, wine.com) and Select (From $28.59, drizly.com), which joined Campari ($34.99, wine.com), and they were all bright red or orange bitter liqueurs that really made a statement. "It was eye-catching and well-marketed with the cool new advertisements that came along with the Futurist movement," says Salcito. Italians latched onto it, and the newest iteration of the Italian spritz was born, consisting of white wine, soda water, and a bitter liqueur.

Why bitter? Salcito thinks it comes from Italians&apos love of food. "There&aposs always a subtext with anything Italian, because so much about Italy has always been about food, dining, and drinking," she says. "The spritz is the perfect aperitivo because it is bitter, so it opens up one&aposs taste buds and is the perfect entry to a meal." And while Aperol existed, it wasn&apost nearly as popular as it is today. That happened in the 1990s, when the company went on an aggressive marketing campaign in certain parts of Northern Italy, around the time prosecco was added to the formula.


The Spritz Is Truly the Drink of Summer—Here's Why

Aperol and beyond, the many variations of this bubbly refresher explained by the spritz expert.

While rosé will always have its place as a summer drink, the spritz has been giving pink wine a run for its money in recent years. The most well known version in the U.S. is the Aperol Spritz, but there are actually dozens of variations, and many trace their roots much farther back than the Aperol one. To get some spritz perspective, we spoke to sommelier Jordan Salcito, the creator of the uber-lovely and refreshing Ramona, one of the first canned wine spritzes on the market when it launched in back in 2016.

Salcito shared that spritzes can be traced as far back as the ancient Romans and Greeks. "Basically, it was considered very uncouth to be drunk at any meal, and the only one who was allowed to drink undiluted wine was Dionysus, the god of wine," she explains. "So it was quite common to add water, or even sea water to wine, and then there were various iterations of that involving adding honey, berries, and flowers." In slightly more modern times, the origin of the spritz is goes back to Northern Italy, when Austrians occupied the land under the Hapsburg Empire. Supposedly, they didn&apost like the taste of the wine there, so they began adding a "spritz" (German for spray) of water to make them more palatable, says Salcito. Today, all spritzes have bubbles, which happened in the early 20th century, as the drink continued to evolve.

"And then, the Italian futurist art movement—which was basically a rejection of the past and an embrace of technology and youth—gave way to the futurist cocktail movement," says Salcito. "It was about using new ingredients and having new flavors and doing things in a new way." Two of these new ingredients were Aperol ($28.99, wine.com) and Select (From $28.59, drizly.com), which joined Campari ($34.99, wine.com), and they were all bright red or orange bitter liqueurs that really made a statement. "It was eye-catching and well-marketed with the cool new advertisements that came along with the Futurist movement," says Salcito. Italians latched onto it, and the newest iteration of the Italian spritz was born, consisting of white wine, soda water, and a bitter liqueur.

Why bitter? Salcito thinks it comes from Italians&apos love of food. "There&aposs always a subtext with anything Italian, because so much about Italy has always been about food, dining, and drinking," she says. "The spritz is the perfect aperitivo because it is bitter, so it opens up one&aposs taste buds and is the perfect entry to a meal." And while Aperol existed, it wasn&apost nearly as popular as it is today. That happened in the 1990s, when the company went on an aggressive marketing campaign in certain parts of Northern Italy, around the time prosecco was added to the formula.


The Spritz Is Truly the Drink of Summer—Here's Why

Aperol and beyond, the many variations of this bubbly refresher explained by the spritz expert.

While rosé will always have its place as a summer drink, the spritz has been giving pink wine a run for its money in recent years. The most well known version in the U.S. is the Aperol Spritz, but there are actually dozens of variations, and many trace their roots much farther back than the Aperol one. To get some spritz perspective, we spoke to sommelier Jordan Salcito, the creator of the uber-lovely and refreshing Ramona, one of the first canned wine spritzes on the market when it launched in back in 2016.

Salcito shared that spritzes can be traced as far back as the ancient Romans and Greeks. "Basically, it was considered very uncouth to be drunk at any meal, and the only one who was allowed to drink undiluted wine was Dionysus, the god of wine," she explains. "So it was quite common to add water, or even sea water to wine, and then there were various iterations of that involving adding honey, berries, and flowers." In slightly more modern times, the origin of the spritz is goes back to Northern Italy, when Austrians occupied the land under the Hapsburg Empire. Supposedly, they didn&apost like the taste of the wine there, so they began adding a "spritz" (German for spray) of water to make them more palatable, says Salcito. Today, all spritzes have bubbles, which happened in the early 20th century, as the drink continued to evolve.

"And then, the Italian futurist art movement—which was basically a rejection of the past and an embrace of technology and youth—gave way to the futurist cocktail movement," says Salcito. "It was about using new ingredients and having new flavors and doing things in a new way." Two of these new ingredients were Aperol ($28.99, wine.com) and Select (From $28.59, drizly.com), which joined Campari ($34.99, wine.com), and they were all bright red or orange bitter liqueurs that really made a statement. "It was eye-catching and well-marketed with the cool new advertisements that came along with the Futurist movement," says Salcito. Italians latched onto it, and the newest iteration of the Italian spritz was born, consisting of white wine, soda water, and a bitter liqueur.

Why bitter? Salcito thinks it comes from Italians&apos love of food. "There&aposs always a subtext with anything Italian, because so much about Italy has always been about food, dining, and drinking," she says. "The spritz is the perfect aperitivo because it is bitter, so it opens up one&aposs taste buds and is the perfect entry to a meal." And while Aperol existed, it wasn&apost nearly as popular as it is today. That happened in the 1990s, when the company went on an aggressive marketing campaign in certain parts of Northern Italy, around the time prosecco was added to the formula.


The Spritz Is Truly the Drink of Summer—Here's Why

Aperol and beyond, the many variations of this bubbly refresher explained by the spritz expert.

While rosé will always have its place as a summer drink, the spritz has been giving pink wine a run for its money in recent years. The most well known version in the U.S. is the Aperol Spritz, but there are actually dozens of variations, and many trace their roots much farther back than the Aperol one. To get some spritz perspective, we spoke to sommelier Jordan Salcito, the creator of the uber-lovely and refreshing Ramona, one of the first canned wine spritzes on the market when it launched in back in 2016.

Salcito shared that spritzes can be traced as far back as the ancient Romans and Greeks. "Basically, it was considered very uncouth to be drunk at any meal, and the only one who was allowed to drink undiluted wine was Dionysus, the god of wine," she explains. "So it was quite common to add water, or even sea water to wine, and then there were various iterations of that involving adding honey, berries, and flowers." In slightly more modern times, the origin of the spritz is goes back to Northern Italy, when Austrians occupied the land under the Hapsburg Empire. Supposedly, they didn&apost like the taste of the wine there, so they began adding a "spritz" (German for spray) of water to make them more palatable, says Salcito. Today, all spritzes have bubbles, which happened in the early 20th century, as the drink continued to evolve.

"And then, the Italian futurist art movement—which was basically a rejection of the past and an embrace of technology and youth—gave way to the futurist cocktail movement," says Salcito. "It was about using new ingredients and having new flavors and doing things in a new way." Two of these new ingredients were Aperol ($28.99, wine.com) and Select (From $28.59, drizly.com), which joined Campari ($34.99, wine.com), and they were all bright red or orange bitter liqueurs that really made a statement. "It was eye-catching and well-marketed with the cool new advertisements that came along with the Futurist movement," says Salcito. Italians latched onto it, and the newest iteration of the Italian spritz was born, consisting of white wine, soda water, and a bitter liqueur.

Why bitter? Salcito thinks it comes from Italians&apos love of food. "There&aposs always a subtext with anything Italian, because so much about Italy has always been about food, dining, and drinking," she says. "The spritz is the perfect aperitivo because it is bitter, so it opens up one&aposs taste buds and is the perfect entry to a meal." And while Aperol existed, it wasn&apost nearly as popular as it is today. That happened in the 1990s, when the company went on an aggressive marketing campaign in certain parts of Northern Italy, around the time prosecco was added to the formula.


The Spritz Is Truly the Drink of Summer—Here's Why

Aperol and beyond, the many variations of this bubbly refresher explained by the spritz expert.

While rosé will always have its place as a summer drink, the spritz has been giving pink wine a run for its money in recent years. The most well known version in the U.S. is the Aperol Spritz, but there are actually dozens of variations, and many trace their roots much farther back than the Aperol one. To get some spritz perspective, we spoke to sommelier Jordan Salcito, the creator of the uber-lovely and refreshing Ramona, one of the first canned wine spritzes on the market when it launched in back in 2016.

Salcito shared that spritzes can be traced as far back as the ancient Romans and Greeks. "Basically, it was considered very uncouth to be drunk at any meal, and the only one who was allowed to drink undiluted wine was Dionysus, the god of wine," she explains. "So it was quite common to add water, or even sea water to wine, and then there were various iterations of that involving adding honey, berries, and flowers." In slightly more modern times, the origin of the spritz is goes back to Northern Italy, when Austrians occupied the land under the Hapsburg Empire. Supposedly, they didn&apost like the taste of the wine there, so they began adding a "spritz" (German for spray) of water to make them more palatable, says Salcito. Today, all spritzes have bubbles, which happened in the early 20th century, as the drink continued to evolve.

"And then, the Italian futurist art movement—which was basically a rejection of the past and an embrace of technology and youth—gave way to the futurist cocktail movement," says Salcito. "It was about using new ingredients and having new flavors and doing things in a new way." Two of these new ingredients were Aperol ($28.99, wine.com) and Select (From $28.59, drizly.com), which joined Campari ($34.99, wine.com), and they were all bright red or orange bitter liqueurs that really made a statement. "It was eye-catching and well-marketed with the cool new advertisements that came along with the Futurist movement," says Salcito. Italians latched onto it, and the newest iteration of the Italian spritz was born, consisting of white wine, soda water, and a bitter liqueur.

Why bitter? Salcito thinks it comes from Italians&apos love of food. "There&aposs always a subtext with anything Italian, because so much about Italy has always been about food, dining, and drinking," she says. "The spritz is the perfect aperitivo because it is bitter, so it opens up one&aposs taste buds and is the perfect entry to a meal." And while Aperol existed, it wasn&apost nearly as popular as it is today. That happened in the 1990s, when the company went on an aggressive marketing campaign in certain parts of Northern Italy, around the time prosecco was added to the formula.


The Spritz Is Truly the Drink of Summer—Here's Why

Aperol and beyond, the many variations of this bubbly refresher explained by the spritz expert.

While rosé will always have its place as a summer drink, the spritz has been giving pink wine a run for its money in recent years. The most well known version in the U.S. is the Aperol Spritz, but there are actually dozens of variations, and many trace their roots much farther back than the Aperol one. To get some spritz perspective, we spoke to sommelier Jordan Salcito, the creator of the uber-lovely and refreshing Ramona, one of the first canned wine spritzes on the market when it launched in back in 2016.

Salcito shared that spritzes can be traced as far back as the ancient Romans and Greeks. "Basically, it was considered very uncouth to be drunk at any meal, and the only one who was allowed to drink undiluted wine was Dionysus, the god of wine," she explains. "So it was quite common to add water, or even sea water to wine, and then there were various iterations of that involving adding honey, berries, and flowers." In slightly more modern times, the origin of the spritz is goes back to Northern Italy, when Austrians occupied the land under the Hapsburg Empire. Supposedly, they didn&apost like the taste of the wine there, so they began adding a "spritz" (German for spray) of water to make them more palatable, says Salcito. Today, all spritzes have bubbles, which happened in the early 20th century, as the drink continued to evolve.

"And then, the Italian futurist art movement—which was basically a rejection of the past and an embrace of technology and youth—gave way to the futurist cocktail movement," says Salcito. "It was about using new ingredients and having new flavors and doing things in a new way." Two of these new ingredients were Aperol ($28.99, wine.com) and Select (From $28.59, drizly.com), which joined Campari ($34.99, wine.com), and they were all bright red or orange bitter liqueurs that really made a statement. "It was eye-catching and well-marketed with the cool new advertisements that came along with the Futurist movement," says Salcito. Italians latched onto it, and the newest iteration of the Italian spritz was born, consisting of white wine, soda water, and a bitter liqueur.

Why bitter? Salcito thinks it comes from Italians&apos love of food. "There&aposs always a subtext with anything Italian, because so much about Italy has always been about food, dining, and drinking," she says. "The spritz is the perfect aperitivo because it is bitter, so it opens up one&aposs taste buds and is the perfect entry to a meal." And while Aperol existed, it wasn&apost nearly as popular as it is today. That happened in the 1990s, when the company went on an aggressive marketing campaign in certain parts of Northern Italy, around the time prosecco was added to the formula.


The Spritz Is Truly the Drink of Summer—Here's Why

Aperol and beyond, the many variations of this bubbly refresher explained by the spritz expert.

While rosé will always have its place as a summer drink, the spritz has been giving pink wine a run for its money in recent years. The most well known version in the U.S. is the Aperol Spritz, but there are actually dozens of variations, and many trace their roots much farther back than the Aperol one. To get some spritz perspective, we spoke to sommelier Jordan Salcito, the creator of the uber-lovely and refreshing Ramona, one of the first canned wine spritzes on the market when it launched in back in 2016.

Salcito shared that spritzes can be traced as far back as the ancient Romans and Greeks. "Basically, it was considered very uncouth to be drunk at any meal, and the only one who was allowed to drink undiluted wine was Dionysus, the god of wine," she explains. "So it was quite common to add water, or even sea water to wine, and then there were various iterations of that involving adding honey, berries, and flowers." In slightly more modern times, the origin of the spritz is goes back to Northern Italy, when Austrians occupied the land under the Hapsburg Empire. Supposedly, they didn&apost like the taste of the wine there, so they began adding a "spritz" (German for spray) of water to make them more palatable, says Salcito. Today, all spritzes have bubbles, which happened in the early 20th century, as the drink continued to evolve.

"And then, the Italian futurist art movement—which was basically a rejection of the past and an embrace of technology and youth—gave way to the futurist cocktail movement," says Salcito. "It was about using new ingredients and having new flavors and doing things in a new way." Two of these new ingredients were Aperol ($28.99, wine.com) and Select (From $28.59, drizly.com), which joined Campari ($34.99, wine.com), and they were all bright red or orange bitter liqueurs that really made a statement. "It was eye-catching and well-marketed with the cool new advertisements that came along with the Futurist movement," says Salcito. Italians latched onto it, and the newest iteration of the Italian spritz was born, consisting of white wine, soda water, and a bitter liqueur.

Why bitter? Salcito thinks it comes from Italians&apos love of food. "There&aposs always a subtext with anything Italian, because so much about Italy has always been about food, dining, and drinking," she says. "The spritz is the perfect aperitivo because it is bitter, so it opens up one&aposs taste buds and is the perfect entry to a meal." And while Aperol existed, it wasn&apost nearly as popular as it is today. That happened in the 1990s, when the company went on an aggressive marketing campaign in certain parts of Northern Italy, around the time prosecco was added to the formula.


The Spritz Is Truly the Drink of Summer—Here's Why

Aperol and beyond, the many variations of this bubbly refresher explained by the spritz expert.

While rosé will always have its place as a summer drink, the spritz has been giving pink wine a run for its money in recent years. The most well known version in the U.S. is the Aperol Spritz, but there are actually dozens of variations, and many trace their roots much farther back than the Aperol one. To get some spritz perspective, we spoke to sommelier Jordan Salcito, the creator of the uber-lovely and refreshing Ramona, one of the first canned wine spritzes on the market when it launched in back in 2016.

Salcito shared that spritzes can be traced as far back as the ancient Romans and Greeks. "Basically, it was considered very uncouth to be drunk at any meal, and the only one who was allowed to drink undiluted wine was Dionysus, the god of wine," she explains. "So it was quite common to add water, or even sea water to wine, and then there were various iterations of that involving adding honey, berries, and flowers." In slightly more modern times, the origin of the spritz is goes back to Northern Italy, when Austrians occupied the land under the Hapsburg Empire. Supposedly, they didn&apost like the taste of the wine there, so they began adding a "spritz" (German for spray) of water to make them more palatable, says Salcito. Today, all spritzes have bubbles, which happened in the early 20th century, as the drink continued to evolve.

"And then, the Italian futurist art movement—which was basically a rejection of the past and an embrace of technology and youth—gave way to the futurist cocktail movement," says Salcito. "It was about using new ingredients and having new flavors and doing things in a new way." Two of these new ingredients were Aperol ($28.99, wine.com) and Select (From $28.59, drizly.com), which joined Campari ($34.99, wine.com), and they were all bright red or orange bitter liqueurs that really made a statement. "It was eye-catching and well-marketed with the cool new advertisements that came along with the Futurist movement," says Salcito. Italians latched onto it, and the newest iteration of the Italian spritz was born, consisting of white wine, soda water, and a bitter liqueur.

Why bitter? Salcito thinks it comes from Italians&apos love of food. "There&aposs always a subtext with anything Italian, because so much about Italy has always been about food, dining, and drinking," she says. "The spritz is the perfect aperitivo because it is bitter, so it opens up one&aposs taste buds and is the perfect entry to a meal." And while Aperol existed, it wasn&apost nearly as popular as it is today. That happened in the 1990s, when the company went on an aggressive marketing campaign in certain parts of Northern Italy, around the time prosecco was added to the formula.


The Spritz Is Truly the Drink of Summer—Here's Why

Aperol and beyond, the many variations of this bubbly refresher explained by the spritz expert.

While rosé will always have its place as a summer drink, the spritz has been giving pink wine a run for its money in recent years. The most well known version in the U.S. is the Aperol Spritz, but there are actually dozens of variations, and many trace their roots much farther back than the Aperol one. To get some spritz perspective, we spoke to sommelier Jordan Salcito, the creator of the uber-lovely and refreshing Ramona, one of the first canned wine spritzes on the market when it launched in back in 2016.

Salcito shared that spritzes can be traced as far back as the ancient Romans and Greeks. "Basically, it was considered very uncouth to be drunk at any meal, and the only one who was allowed to drink undiluted wine was Dionysus, the god of wine," she explains. "So it was quite common to add water, or even sea water to wine, and then there were various iterations of that involving adding honey, berries, and flowers." In slightly more modern times, the origin of the spritz is goes back to Northern Italy, when Austrians occupied the land under the Hapsburg Empire. Supposedly, they didn&apost like the taste of the wine there, so they began adding a "spritz" (German for spray) of water to make them more palatable, says Salcito. Today, all spritzes have bubbles, which happened in the early 20th century, as the drink continued to evolve.

"And then, the Italian futurist art movement—which was basically a rejection of the past and an embrace of technology and youth—gave way to the futurist cocktail movement," says Salcito. "It was about using new ingredients and having new flavors and doing things in a new way." Two of these new ingredients were Aperol ($28.99, wine.com) and Select (From $28.59, drizly.com), which joined Campari ($34.99, wine.com), and they were all bright red or orange bitter liqueurs that really made a statement. "It was eye-catching and well-marketed with the cool new advertisements that came along with the Futurist movement," says Salcito. Italians latched onto it, and the newest iteration of the Italian spritz was born, consisting of white wine, soda water, and a bitter liqueur.

Why bitter? Salcito thinks it comes from Italians&apos love of food. "There&aposs always a subtext with anything Italian, because so much about Italy has always been about food, dining, and drinking," she says. "The spritz is the perfect aperitivo because it is bitter, so it opens up one&aposs taste buds and is the perfect entry to a meal." And while Aperol existed, it wasn&apost nearly as popular as it is today. That happened in the 1990s, when the company went on an aggressive marketing campaign in certain parts of Northern Italy, around the time prosecco was added to the formula.


Watch the video: Trader Joes Reserve Brut Rose Sparkling Wine (January 2022).