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VIDEO: Hung Huynh's Shrimp Pancetta Flatbreads

VIDEO: Hung Huynh's Shrimp Pancetta Flatbreads



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October 11, 2011

By

Ali Rosen, Daily Meal Video

The executive chef of Catch, and Top Chef season 3 winner, teaches the tricks to his shrimp pancetta flatbreads

Hung Huynh's Shrimp Pancetta Flatbreads

The executive chef of Catch, and Top Chef season 3 winner, teaches the tricks to his shrimp pancetta flatbreads

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  • Hung Huynh's Shrimp Pancetta Flatbreads 2:21 mins

Ali Rosen

Chef Hung Huynh


Prosciutto is made from the hind leg of a pig. Once the leg is cleaned, it is heavily salted with sea salt by a maestro salatore (salt master) and left for several weeks in a cool, dry environment. The salting process removes leftover moisture, creating an nonconducive environment for bacteria to form. It also creates a distinctive flavor.

The legs are then hung in cool, humid rooms for 60 to 90 days. When the salt curing is over, the leg is washed, the salt brushed from the meat, and the ham is left to dry for 12 to 36 months in large buildings that capture and circulate breezes throughout the drying rooms. It is said that the unique quality of the breezes where this drying process takes place is what gives different Italian prosciutti crudo their unique flavor profiles.

In addition to the salting and air-drying, the amount of time the prosciutto is allowed to age makes a huge difference. A young prosciutto is bright reddish pink, with a soft, moist texture and a sweet flavor. As it ages, it becomes drier and firmer, with an orange veneer, and a more refined, subtle, and complex flavor.


Prosciutto is made from the hind leg of a pig. Once the leg is cleaned, it is heavily salted with sea salt by a maestro salatore (salt master) and left for several weeks in a cool, dry environment. The salting process removes leftover moisture, creating an nonconducive environment for bacteria to form. It also creates a distinctive flavor.

The legs are then hung in cool, humid rooms for 60 to 90 days. When the salt curing is over, the leg is washed, the salt brushed from the meat, and the ham is left to dry for 12 to 36 months in large buildings that capture and circulate breezes throughout the drying rooms. It is said that the unique quality of the breezes where this drying process takes place is what gives different Italian prosciutti crudo their unique flavor profiles.

In addition to the salting and air-drying, the amount of time the prosciutto is allowed to age makes a huge difference. A young prosciutto is bright reddish pink, with a soft, moist texture and a sweet flavor. As it ages, it becomes drier and firmer, with an orange veneer, and a more refined, subtle, and complex flavor.


Prosciutto is made from the hind leg of a pig. Once the leg is cleaned, it is heavily salted with sea salt by a maestro salatore (salt master) and left for several weeks in a cool, dry environment. The salting process removes leftover moisture, creating an nonconducive environment for bacteria to form. It also creates a distinctive flavor.

The legs are then hung in cool, humid rooms for 60 to 90 days. When the salt curing is over, the leg is washed, the salt brushed from the meat, and the ham is left to dry for 12 to 36 months in large buildings that capture and circulate breezes throughout the drying rooms. It is said that the unique quality of the breezes where this drying process takes place is what gives different Italian prosciutti crudo their unique flavor profiles.

In addition to the salting and air-drying, the amount of time the prosciutto is allowed to age makes a huge difference. A young prosciutto is bright reddish pink, with a soft, moist texture and a sweet flavor. As it ages, it becomes drier and firmer, with an orange veneer, and a more refined, subtle, and complex flavor.


Prosciutto is made from the hind leg of a pig. Once the leg is cleaned, it is heavily salted with sea salt by a maestro salatore (salt master) and left for several weeks in a cool, dry environment. The salting process removes leftover moisture, creating an nonconducive environment for bacteria to form. It also creates a distinctive flavor.

The legs are then hung in cool, humid rooms for 60 to 90 days. When the salt curing is over, the leg is washed, the salt brushed from the meat, and the ham is left to dry for 12 to 36 months in large buildings that capture and circulate breezes throughout the drying rooms. It is said that the unique quality of the breezes where this drying process takes place is what gives different Italian prosciutti crudo their unique flavor profiles.

In addition to the salting and air-drying, the amount of time the prosciutto is allowed to age makes a huge difference. A young prosciutto is bright reddish pink, with a soft, moist texture and a sweet flavor. As it ages, it becomes drier and firmer, with an orange veneer, and a more refined, subtle, and complex flavor.


Prosciutto is made from the hind leg of a pig. Once the leg is cleaned, it is heavily salted with sea salt by a maestro salatore (salt master) and left for several weeks in a cool, dry environment. The salting process removes leftover moisture, creating an nonconducive environment for bacteria to form. It also creates a distinctive flavor.

The legs are then hung in cool, humid rooms for 60 to 90 days. When the salt curing is over, the leg is washed, the salt brushed from the meat, and the ham is left to dry for 12 to 36 months in large buildings that capture and circulate breezes throughout the drying rooms. It is said that the unique quality of the breezes where this drying process takes place is what gives different Italian prosciutti crudo their unique flavor profiles.

In addition to the salting and air-drying, the amount of time the prosciutto is allowed to age makes a huge difference. A young prosciutto is bright reddish pink, with a soft, moist texture and a sweet flavor. As it ages, it becomes drier and firmer, with an orange veneer, and a more refined, subtle, and complex flavor.


Prosciutto is made from the hind leg of a pig. Once the leg is cleaned, it is heavily salted with sea salt by a maestro salatore (salt master) and left for several weeks in a cool, dry environment. The salting process removes leftover moisture, creating an nonconducive environment for bacteria to form. It also creates a distinctive flavor.

The legs are then hung in cool, humid rooms for 60 to 90 days. When the salt curing is over, the leg is washed, the salt brushed from the meat, and the ham is left to dry for 12 to 36 months in large buildings that capture and circulate breezes throughout the drying rooms. It is said that the unique quality of the breezes where this drying process takes place is what gives different Italian prosciutti crudo their unique flavor profiles.

In addition to the salting and air-drying, the amount of time the prosciutto is allowed to age makes a huge difference. A young prosciutto is bright reddish pink, with a soft, moist texture and a sweet flavor. As it ages, it becomes drier and firmer, with an orange veneer, and a more refined, subtle, and complex flavor.


Prosciutto is made from the hind leg of a pig. Once the leg is cleaned, it is heavily salted with sea salt by a maestro salatore (salt master) and left for several weeks in a cool, dry environment. The salting process removes leftover moisture, creating an nonconducive environment for bacteria to form. It also creates a distinctive flavor.

The legs are then hung in cool, humid rooms for 60 to 90 days. When the salt curing is over, the leg is washed, the salt brushed from the meat, and the ham is left to dry for 12 to 36 months in large buildings that capture and circulate breezes throughout the drying rooms. It is said that the unique quality of the breezes where this drying process takes place is what gives different Italian prosciutti crudo their unique flavor profiles.

In addition to the salting and air-drying, the amount of time the prosciutto is allowed to age makes a huge difference. A young prosciutto is bright reddish pink, with a soft, moist texture and a sweet flavor. As it ages, it becomes drier and firmer, with an orange veneer, and a more refined, subtle, and complex flavor.


Prosciutto is made from the hind leg of a pig. Once the leg is cleaned, it is heavily salted with sea salt by a maestro salatore (salt master) and left for several weeks in a cool, dry environment. The salting process removes leftover moisture, creating an nonconducive environment for bacteria to form. It also creates a distinctive flavor.

The legs are then hung in cool, humid rooms for 60 to 90 days. When the salt curing is over, the leg is washed, the salt brushed from the meat, and the ham is left to dry for 12 to 36 months in large buildings that capture and circulate breezes throughout the drying rooms. It is said that the unique quality of the breezes where this drying process takes place is what gives different Italian prosciutti crudo their unique flavor profiles.

In addition to the salting and air-drying, the amount of time the prosciutto is allowed to age makes a huge difference. A young prosciutto is bright reddish pink, with a soft, moist texture and a sweet flavor. As it ages, it becomes drier and firmer, with an orange veneer, and a more refined, subtle, and complex flavor.


Prosciutto is made from the hind leg of a pig. Once the leg is cleaned, it is heavily salted with sea salt by a maestro salatore (salt master) and left for several weeks in a cool, dry environment. The salting process removes leftover moisture, creating an nonconducive environment for bacteria to form. It also creates a distinctive flavor.

The legs are then hung in cool, humid rooms for 60 to 90 days. When the salt curing is over, the leg is washed, the salt brushed from the meat, and the ham is left to dry for 12 to 36 months in large buildings that capture and circulate breezes throughout the drying rooms. It is said that the unique quality of the breezes where this drying process takes place is what gives different Italian prosciutti crudo their unique flavor profiles.

In addition to the salting and air-drying, the amount of time the prosciutto is allowed to age makes a huge difference. A young prosciutto is bright reddish pink, with a soft, moist texture and a sweet flavor. As it ages, it becomes drier and firmer, with an orange veneer, and a more refined, subtle, and complex flavor.


Prosciutto is made from the hind leg of a pig. Once the leg is cleaned, it is heavily salted with sea salt by a maestro salatore (salt master) and left for several weeks in a cool, dry environment. The salting process removes leftover moisture, creating an nonconducive environment for bacteria to form. It also creates a distinctive flavor.

The legs are then hung in cool, humid rooms for 60 to 90 days. When the salt curing is over, the leg is washed, the salt brushed from the meat, and the ham is left to dry for 12 to 36 months in large buildings that capture and circulate breezes throughout the drying rooms. It is said that the unique quality of the breezes where this drying process takes place is what gives different Italian prosciutti crudo their unique flavor profiles.

In addition to the salting and air-drying, the amount of time the prosciutto is allowed to age makes a huge difference. A young prosciutto is bright reddish pink, with a soft, moist texture and a sweet flavor. As it ages, it becomes drier and firmer, with an orange veneer, and a more refined, subtle, and complex flavor.


Watch the video: Top Chef Winner Makes Lobster For Forbes. Forbes (August 2022).